Martin Lambert

Professor Martin Lambert

Professor

School of Civil, Environmental and Mining Engineering

Faculty of Sciences, Engineering and Technology

Eligible to supervise Masters and PhD - email supervisor to discuss availability.


Professor Martin Lambert, Head of School, School of Civil, Environmental and Mining Engineering

Research Interests

Prof Martin F. Lambert is  Professor of Water Engineering and Hydraulics in the School of Civil, Environmental and Mining Engineering at the University of Adelaide and was previously Head of the School of Civil, Environmental and Mining Engineering from 2009-2012 and 2015-2017 and the Associate Dean (Research) in the ECMS Faculty from 2006-2009. His research has focused on several aspects of water engineering related to stochastic hydrology and the use of fluid transients for the effective and efficient condition assessment of the aging engineered pipe infrastructure. He has taught a range of subjects in the School and has been awarded several prizes for teaching including the University Prize for Excellence in Higher Degree by Research Supervision in 2008 and an Australian Learning & Teaching Council citation in 2009.

 

Prof Lambert graduated in 1988 with a Bachelor of Civil Engineering (Hon 1) from the University of Newcastle, Australia.  Since stating at Adelaide University in June 1995 Prof Lambert has developed several new research areas and received over $4.9 million in research funds mainly from the Australian Research Council.  He also has worked with industry while undertaking consulting projects in the water engineering area. Prof Lambert continues to publish papers in international journals and conferences in all area of his research.  His current research areas are listed below.

Current Research Areas
  • Inverse transient techniques for condition assessment of water distribution systems. This new area of research uses small water hammer waves that travel very rapidly around a pipe system to detect the occurrence, location and size of problems in pipes
  • Sensor networks in water distribution systems for monitoring transient pressure
  • Biofilms in pipelines and the impact on pipe roughness
  • Iron nanowires from pipe biofilms
  • Development of spatial and point rainfall simulation model for continuous simulation in hydrology.
  • Determining the effects of catchment moisture conditions on flood frequency distributions and examining the joint probability problem arising from the interaction between freshwater floods and ocean water levels.
  • Discharge reduction in straight compound channels caused by momentum interaction effects between the main channel and the floodplain.

Research Funding

Title Granting Body Period Amount
Large Research Grants Received
High-resolution pipeline condition assessment using hydraulic transients ARC (Discovery) 2017-2019 $499,000
Mobile weather radar system for advanced environmental monitoring and modelling ARC (LIEF) 2013-2016 $340,000

Cost Effective Pipeline Condition Assessment Using Paired Pressure Sensor Arrays  (Lambert, Simpson, Zecchin and Arkwright)

ARC (Discovery)

DP140100994

Principal Investigator

2014-2017

$430,000

Combining transient micro-reflections and multi-sensor arrays for condition assessment of buried pipes  (Lambert, Simpson, Zecchin and Simmons)

ARC (Linkage - Industry)

LP130100567

2013-2016

$285,000

       

A new flood design methodology for a variable and changing climate (Lambert, Kuczera, Thyer and Metcalfe)

ARC (Discovery)

DP1094796

Principal Investigator

2010-2012

$340,000

Frequency Domain Micro-Reflection Processing for Pipe Condition Assessment (Simpson, Lambert and White)

ARC (Discovery)

DP1095270

Chief Investigator

2010-2012

$370,000

Optimal Water Resource Mix for Metropolitan Adelaide Phase 1   – Task 4

(Thyer and Lambert)

Goyder Institute Project

55111367

2012-2014

$340,672

C.1.1  Climate Change (Thyer, Lambert, Maier and Dandy)

Goyder Institute Project

55108584

2010-2014

$501,552

A stochastic space-time model of rainfall fields in large heterogeneous regions (Lambert, Kuczera, Metcalfe, Thyer, Cowpertwait)

ARC (Discovery)

DP0770860

Principal Investigator

 

2007-2009

$345,880

Micro-reflections for pipe condition assessment in water networks (Simpson, Lambert, Ghidaoui, Lee)

ARC (Discovery)

DP0772320

Chief Investigator

2007-2009

$380,000

A Bayesian hierarchical approach for simulating multi-time scale hydrological variability for water resource planning (Thyer; Franks, Kuczera, Lambert, Metcalfe, Berghout) Ind. Partner: Hunter Water

ARC (Linkage - Industry)

LP0562650

Chief Investigator

 

2005-2008

$87,844

Validation of pipe wall condition assessment techniques for major water pipelines in South Australia. (Lambert and Simpson)

Contract Research

SA Water

Principal Investigator)

2007-2008

$185,000

A new approach to systematic blockage detection and mapping in water distribution systems. (Simpson, Lambert, Nixon)

Ind. Partner: United Water International

ARC

(Linkage – Industry)

 LP0455201

Chief Investigator

 

2004-2007

$131,005

Stochastic spatial rainfall model for engineering risk assessment. (Lambert, Kuczera, Metcalfe)

ARC (Discovery)

DP0452180

Principal Investigator

2004-2006

$188,000

Continuous non-invasive assessment of the physical condition of water distribution systems. (Simpson, Lambert, White, Liggett)

ARC (Discovery)

DP0450788

Chief Investigator

 

2004-2006

$344,000

Laboratory and field testing of a leak detection technique using fluid transients (Simpson, Lambert, Karney – University of Toronto).

ARC (Linkage Int.) LX0242364

Chief Investigator

 

2002-2004

$42,448

Coded transients for monitoring and assessment of fluid distribution systems. (Simpson, Lambert, Liggett)

ARC (Large)

Chief Investigator

 

2001-2003

$235,000

Inverse transients for detecting closed valves, blockages and pipe constrictions in water networks. (Simpson and Lambert)

ARC  (SPIRT)

Chief Investigator

 

2001-2003

$96,000

Leak detection for water distribution systems (Simpson, Lambert, Assoc. Prof. B. Brunone of University of Perugia, Italy).

ARC (Linkage International)

Chief Investigator

 

2000-2002

$36,500

An improved rainfall simulation model for use in engineering analysis and risk assessment. (Kuczera, Lambert)

ARC (Large)

 

1999-2001

$152,000

Artificial mixing for destratification and control of cynobacterial growth in reservoirs (Lambert).

CRC Water Quality and Treatment

Chief Investigator

 

1999-2001

$84,000

LECTURING RESPONSIBILITIES:

My main teaching responsibilities have covered the areas of fundamental civil engineering hydraulics and fluid mechanics, open channel flow, hydrology, water resources management and construction and surveying. The table below lists some of the courses I have taught while at the University of Adelaide. 

Course

Period

Level 

 Remarks

       
Engineering Mechanics – Statics (Summer Semester) 2016-2017 I This course familiarises students with the principles of static equilibrium by applying Newton's laws of motion to solve engineering problems. Emphasis is placed on drawing free body diagrams and self checking strategies. Topics include introduction to forces; 2D equilibrium of particles and rigid bodies; centre of gravity and centroids; distributed loading and hydrostatics; friction; analysis of truss structures; and shear force and bending moment diagrams.
Research Methodology  2010-2011 V

This course will consist of guided reading and study directed towards understanding the nature of research and how it is conducted. Students will work in small groups and carry out a literature review and write a research proposal on a topic related to water resources management. They will also give an oral presentation based on their work during the semester. Each group will meet with their supervisor on a weekly basis throughout the semester.

Analysis of Rivers 2006,2013,2014 IV This course examined advanced topics in open channel flow such as flow in compound river channels, curvilinear flows, unsteady flow and transitions. These was followed by an introduction to River Mechanics and modelling flow in 2D and 3D situations, such as meandering channels and flow around piers and other structures. The course then introduced concepts in sediment transport and examine techniques to predict the threshold of motion, sediment transport rates as well as local scour and morphology changes.  25 Students
Eng Mod. Analysis I  2005-2006
  I
This course serves as an introduction to how engineers typically solve “real world” and complex problems. In many cases mathematical or analytical solutions are impossible. For engineers charged with solving these problems this situation is untenable.

This course introduced students to this important area and provided training in its fundamental components. These include

  • Being comfortable with how a computer works and understanding different computing environments.
  • To be able to program and write scripts to execute models and analyze engineering problems.
  • Learn the syntax of Fortran 90/95, Visual Basic in Excel (VBA) and Matlab.
  • Understand the development of programs that are well structured and can be maintained.
  • To be introduced to some of the algorithms that you will study in more detail in later years for solving complex problems.
  • Be exposed to civil engineering analysis programs.

Computing and Hydraulics

1996-1998

P/G

This course was a core component of the Joint Universities Masters programme in Hydrology and Water Resources. It dealt with advanced computer programming in FORTRAN and a range of hydraulics subjects ranging from pipe flow, open channel flow, flow measurement and unsteady flow.

15 students.

Advanced Water Resources Management

1997, 2001, 2003 2004

IV and P/G

Advanced hydrological times series analysis, Monte-carlo simulation, sustainability, world water issues, water quality issues, yield analysis, dam reliability and water sensitive urban design.

30 students.

Water Engineering and Design IIIA

1995-2001, 2004

III

Steady and unsteady open channel flow, hydraulic structures, sediment transport, environmental problems resulting from river engineering, laboratory experiments 60-90 students.

Environmental Engineering and Design III

1997

III

Advanced hydrological and environmental analysis and processes, water and wastewater treatment.

60-70 students.

Water Engineering IIS1- Hydraulics

1998, 2002

II

Introduction to fluid mechanics and civil engineering hydraulics.

60-70 students.

Water Engineering IIS2- Hydrology

1996-1998

II

Engineering hydrology, meteorology, rainfall analysis, flood routing, hydrological design and flood frequency analysis.

 60-70 students.

Construction and Surveying

1997

II

Basic surveying techniques, construction equipment and practices, project management and planning, critical path methods, resource management.

60-70 students.

 

PROJECT SUPERVISION AND TUTORIALS:

 

Course

Period

Level

Remarks

Final Year Research Project

1996-present

IV

These open-ended research projects are undertaken by students in groups of 2-4 and involve a literature review, advanced numerical computation, laboratory or fieldwork, a conference style presentation of their work and the preparation of a substantial thesis.

2-3 groups of 4 students.

Final Year Design

1999

IV

The final year class undertake a large capstone design. This project was designing a new bridge over the River Murray at Berri.

Environmental Engineering and Design III (Design Component)

2004

III

This involved setting and running the design project for this course. The students were asked to design a fishway for the barrages at the mouth of the River Murray.

20 students.

 

  • Position: Professor
  • Phone: 83135838
  • Email: martin.lambert@adelaide.edu.au
  • Fax: 83134359
  • Campus: North Terrace
  • Building: Engineering North, floor 2
  • Org Unit: School of Civil, Environmental and Mining Engineering

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