Daniel Carragher

Daniel Carragher

School of Psychology

Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences


I joined the University of Adelaide as a Lecturer in November 2021. I received my PhD in 2019 from Flinders University, before joining the Stirling Face laboratory at the University of Stirling in 2020.

Generally speaking, my research examines how we perceive human faces. My work seeks to understand how we recognise faces and emotional expressions, make first impressions from facial appearance, and perform identity matching tasks. My work also examines that factors that help or hinder performance on these tasks.

Current lines of research include investing how COVID-19 face masks affect identity and emotion recognition, how we make first impressions of faces in naturalistic social scenes, and how humans perform face recognition and matching tasks when working with others or automated facial recognition systems.

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  • Journals

    Year Citation
    2021 Carragher, D. J., Thomas, N. A., & Nicholls, M. E. R. (2021). The dissociable influence of social context on judgements of facial attractiveness and trustworthiness. British Journal of Psychology, 112(4), 902-933.
    DOI Scopus2 WoS2 Europe PMC1
    2021 Hsieh, J. Y. J., Gwinn, O. S., Brooks, K. R., Stephen, I. D., Carragher, D. J., & Nicholls, M. E. R. (2021). The “cheerleader effect” in facial and bodily attractiveness: A result of memory bias and not perceptual encoding. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 74(5), 972-980.
    DOI Scopus3 Europe PMC1
    2021 Ciricugno, A., Bartlett, M. L., Gwinn, O. S., Carragher, D. J., & Nicholls, M. E. R. (2021). The effect of cognitive load on horizontal and vertical spatial asymmetries. Laterality, 26(6), 706-724.
    DOI Scopus1 Europe PMC1
    2020 Carragher, D. J., Thomas, N. A., Gwinn, O. S., & Nicholls, M. E. R. (2020). The cheerleader effect is robust to experimental manipulations of presentation time. Journal of Cognitive Psychology, 32(5-6), 553-561.
    DOI Scopus4 WoS4
    2020 Carragher, D. J., & Hancock, P. J. B. (2020). Surgical face masks impair human face matching performance for familiar and unfamiliar faces. Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications, 5(1), 15 pages.
    DOI Scopus15 WoS12 Europe PMC8
    2019 Carragher, D. J., Thomas, N. A., Gwinn, O. S., & Nicholls, M. E. R. (2019). Limited evidence of hierarchical encoding in the cheerleader effect. Scientific Reports, 9(1), 13 pages.
    DOI Scopus11 WoS10 Europe PMC1
    2018 Carragher, D. J., Lawrence, B. J., Thomas, N. A., & Nicholls, M. E. R. (2018). Visuospatial asymmetries do not modulate the cheerleader effect. Scientific Reports, 8(1), 10 pages.
    DOI Scopus6 WoS12 Europe PMC2
    2018 Carragher, D. J., Thomas, N. A., & Nicholls, M. E. R. (2018). Is trustworthiness lateralized in the face? Evidence from a trust game. Laterality, 23(1), 20-38.
    DOI Scopus5 WoS6 Europe PMC2
    Carragher, D. J., & Hancock, P. (n.d.). Surgical face masks impair human face matching performance for familiar and unfamiliar faces.
    DOI
    Carragher, D. J., Towler, A., Mileva, V. R., White, D., & Hancock, P. (n.d.). Masked face identification is improved by diagnostic feature training.
    DOI
    Carragher, D. J., Thomas, N. A., Gwinn, O. S., & Nicholls, M. (n.d.). The cheerleader effect is robust to experimental manipulations of presentation time.
    DOI

Lecturer & Course Coordinator

2022 (Semester 1) -  Advanced Career & Research Skills in Psychology A (PSYCHOL 3011A)

2022 (Semester 2) - Perception & Cognition (PSYCHOL 3023)


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