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Professor Robert Hill

Robert Hill
Director, Environment Institute
Environment Institute
Division of Research and Innovation

Professor Robert Hill is the Director of the Environment Institute.

He is a graduate of the University of Adelaide. He completed his Ph.D. on Tertiary plant macrofossils in 1981, and his D.Sc. on the interaction between climate change and the evolution of the living Australian vegetation in 1997. In 1979 he accepted a position as Tutor in Botany at James Cook University, and in 1980 he was offered a lecturing position in the Department of Botany at the University of Tasmania. He remained at the University of Tasmania until 1999, after being promoted to Professor in 1993. He was Head of the School of Plant Science for 6 years prior to his departure, and was awarded Professor Emeritus status by the University of Tasmania Council in 2000. In 1999 he returned to the University of Adelaide as an Australian Research Council (ARC) Senior Research Fellow, in 2001 he was appointed Head of Science at the South Australian Museum and in 2003 became Head of the School of Earth and Environmental Sciences. He was appointed to his current position of Executive Dean in September 2006.

During his career he has won many awards including the Clarke and Burbidge Medals for his research into the impact of long-term climate change on the evolution of Australian vegetation. He is currently Editor in Chief of the Australian Journal of Botany.

Professor Hill has had a profound impact on the study of Botany in Australia. He has been instrumental in raising the profile of modern botanical studies through his own research which is of the highest international standard, through the training of numerous honours and postgraduate students, many of whom now hold botanical research positions in their own right, and through his distinguished service to botanical societies, organisations and government agencies.
His botanical research has made significant contributions to the areas of palaeobotany, plant systematics, plant ecophysiology and the application of research from these areas to interpreting changes that have occurred to the Australian flora through evolutionary time.

He has had a lifetime interest in the evolution of the vegetation of Australia and Antarctica. He has published more than 125 refereed journal papers, 35 book chapters, several symposium papers and has edited or co-edited four books, including The History of the Australian Vegetation (Cambridge University Press), Ecology of the Southern Conifers (Melbourne University Press), The Ecology and Biogeography of Nothofagus Forests (Yale University Press), and Vegetation of Tasmania (Australian Biological Resources Study).

He is best known for his research on the fossil history of the southern beech, Nothofagus, and the southern conifers. His research on the fossil history of Nothofagus has been critical in refining our understanding of its evolution and has led to a major revision of our understanding of the biogeography of this critical southern genus.

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Professor Robert Hill

Professor Robert Hill is the Director of the Environment Institute.

He is a graduate of the University of Adelaide. He completed his Ph.D. on Tertiary plant macrofossils in 1981, and his D.Sc. on the interaction between climate change and the evolution of the living Australian vegetation in 1997. In 1979 he accepted a position as Tutor in Botany at James Cook University, and in 1980 he was offered a lecturing position in the Department of Botany at the University of Tasmania. He remained at the University of Tasmania until 1999, after being promoted to Professor in 1993. He was Head of the School of Plant Science for 6 years prior to his departure, and was awarded Professor Emeritus status by the University of Tasmania Council in 2000. In 1999 he returned to the University of Adelaide as an Australian Research Council (ARC) Senior Research Fellow, in 2001 he was appointed Head of Science at the South Australian Museum and in 2003 became Head of the School of Earth and Environmental Sciences. He was appointed to his current position of Executive Dean in September 2006.

During his career he has won many awards including the Clarke and Burbidge Medals for his research into the impact of long-term climate change on the evolution of Australian vegetation. He is currently Editor in Chief of the Australian Journal of Botany.

Professor Hill has had a profound impact on the study of Botany in Australia. He has been instrumental in raising the profile of modern botanical studies through his own research which is of the highest international standard, through the training of numerous honours and postgraduate students, many of whom now hold botanical research positions in their own right, and through his distinguished service to botanical societies, organisations and government agencies.
His botanical research has made significant contributions to the areas of palaeobotany, plant systematics, plant ecophysiology and the application of research from these areas to interpreting changes that have occurred to the Australian flora through evolutionary time.

He has had a lifetime interest in the evolution of the vegetation of Australia and Antarctica. He has published more than 125 refereed journal papers, 35 book chapters, several symposium papers and has edited or co-edited four books, including The History of the Australian Vegetation (Cambridge University Press), Ecology of the Southern Conifers (Melbourne University Press), The Ecology and Biogeography of Nothofagus Forests (Yale University Press), and Vegetation of Tasmania (Australian Biological Resources Study).

He is best known for his research on the fossil history of the southern beech, Nothofagus, and the southern conifers. His research on the fossil history of Nothofagus has been critical in refining our understanding of its evolution and has led to a major revision of our understanding of the biogeography of this critical southern genus.

Eligible to supervise Masters and PhD — email supervisor to discuss availability.

Research Interests

Professor Hill has had a profound impact on the study of Botany in Australia. He has been instrumental in raising the profile of modern botanical studies through his own research which is of the highest international standard, through the training of numerous honours and postgraduate students, many of whom now hold botanical research positions in their own right, and through his distinguished service to botanical societies, organisations and government agencies.

His botanical research has made significant contributions to the areas of palaeobotany, plant systematics, plant ecophysiology and the application of research from these areas to interpreting changes that have occurred to the Australian flora through evolutionary time.

He has had a lifetime interest in the evolution of the vegetation of Australia and Antarctica. He has published more than 125 refereed journal papers, 35 book chapters, several symposium papers and has edited or co-edited four books, including The History of the Australian Vegetation (Cambridge University Press), Ecology of the Southern Conifers (Melbourne University Press), The Ecology and Biogeography of Nothofagus Forests (Yale University Press), and Vegetation of Tasmania (Australian Biological Resources Study).

He is best known for his research on the fossil history of the southern beech, Nothofagus, and the southern conifers. His research on the fossil history of Nothofagus has been critical in refining our understanding of its evolution and has led to a major revision of our understanding of the biogeography of this critical southern genus.

Appointments

Date Position Institution name
2011 Director The University of Adelaide
2007 - 2008 Chair The University of Adelaide
2006 - 2017 Executive Dean The University of Adelaide
2003 - 2006 Head of School The University of Adelaide
2001 Director of Science SA Museum
1999 - 2003 Professor & ARC Senior Research Fellow University of Adelaide
1993 - 1999 Professor in Plant Science University of Tasmania
1991 - 1992 Associate Professor in Plant Science University of Tasmania
1991 - 1991 Reader in Plant Science University of Tasmania
1988 - 1990 Senior Lecturer in Plant Science University of Tasmania
1980 - 1987 Lecturer in Botany University of Tasmania

Awards and Achievements

Date Type Title Institution Name Country Amount
2003 Achievement Research Associate of the Royal Zoological Society SA Australia
2002 Recognition Nancy Burbridge Medal Systematic Botany Society
1975 Achievement The Ernest Ayers Scholarship in Botany
1975 Award JG Wood Memorial Prize for Botany
1974 Award Elsie Marion Cornish Prize for Botany

Language Competencies

Language Competency
English Can read, write, speak, understand spoken and peer review

Education

Date Institution name Country Title
1997 University of Adelaide Australia D.Sc
1981 University of Adelaide Australia PhD
1977 University of Adelaide Australia First Class Honours
1976 University of Adelaide Australia B.Sc.

Research Interests

Journals

Year Citation
2017 Tarran, M., Wilson, P., Macphail, M., Jordan, G., & Hill, R. (2017). Two fossil species of Metrosideros (Myrtaceae) from the Oligo-Miocene golden Fleece locality in Tasmania, Australia. American Journal of Botany, 104(6), 891-904.
DOI
2017 Carpenter, R., Tarran, M., & Hill, R. (2017). Leaf fossils of Proteaceae subfamily Persoonioideae, tribe Persoonieae: tracing the past of an important Australasian sclerophyll lineage. Australian Systematic Botany, 30(2), 148-158.
DOI Scopus1 WoS1
2016 Tarran, M., Wilson, P., & Hill, R. (2016). Oldest record of Metrosideros (Myrtaceae): fossil flowers, fruits, and leaves from Australia. American Journal of Botany, 103(4), 754-768.
DOI Scopus3 WoS2 Europe PMC1
2016 Carpenter, R., Jordan, G., & Hill, R. (2016). Fossil leaves of Banksia, Banksieae and pretenders: resolving the fossil genus Banksieaephyllum. Australian Systematic Botany, 29(2), 126-141.
DOI Scopus1 WoS2
2016 Hill, R., & Jordan, G. (2016). Fire in Australia: How was the biota prepared for human occupation?. Australian Journal of Botany, 64(8), 555-556.
DOI
2016 Hill, R., & Jordan, G. (2016). Deep history of wildfire in Australia. Australian Journal of Botany, 64(8), 557-563.
DOI Scopus3 WoS2
2016 Hill, R., Beer, Y., Hill, K., Maciunas, E., Tarran, M., & Wainman, C. (2016). Evolution of the eucalypts - an interpretation from the macrofossil record. Australian Journal of Botany, 64(8), 600-608.
DOI Scopus6 WoS5
2015 Hill, K., Guerin, G., Hill, R., & Watling, J. (2015). Temperature influences stomatal density and maximum potential water loss through stomata of Dodonaea viscosa subsp. angustissima along a latitude gradient in southern Australia. Australian Journal of Botany, 62(8), 657-665.
DOI Scopus5 WoS6 Europe PMC3
2015 McGowran, B., & Hill, R. (2015). Cenozoic climatic shifts in southern Australia. Transactions of the Royal Society of South Australia, 139(1), 19-37.
DOI Scopus3 WoS3
2015 Hill, R., Jordan, G., & Macphail, M. (2015). Why we should retain Nothofagus sensu lato. Australian Systematic Botany, 28(3), 190-193.
DOI Scopus6 WoS6
2015 Carpenter, R., Macphail, M., Jordan, G., & Hill, R. (2015). Fossil evidence for open, Proteaceae-dominated heathlands and fire in the Late Cretaceous of Australia. American Journal of Botany, 102(12), 2092-2107.
DOI Scopus20 WoS21 Europe PMC7
2014 Watling, J. (2014). Do CO2, temperature, rainfall and elevation influence stomatal traits and leaf width in Melaleuca lanceolata across southern Australia?. Australian Journal of Botany, 62(8), 666-673.
DOI Scopus4 WoS4
2014 Carpenter, R., McLoughlin, S., Hill, R., McNamara, K., & Jordan, G. (2014). Early evidence of xeromorphy in angiosperms: stomatal encryption in a new eocene species of banksia (proteaceae) from western australia. American Journal Of Botany, 101(9), 1486-1497.
DOI Scopus11 WoS11
2013 Mellick, R., Rossetto, M., Allen, C., Wilson, P., Hill, R., & Lowe, A. (2013). Intraspecific divergence associated with a biogeographic barrier and climatic models show future threats and long-term decline of a rainforest conifer. The Open Conservation Biology Journal, 7(1), 1-10.
DOI Scopus4
2012 Mellick, R., Lowe, A., Allen, C., Hill, R., & Rossetto, M. (2012). Palaeodistribution modelling and genetic evidence highlight differential post-glacial range shifts of a rain forest conifer distributed across a latitudinal gradient. Journal of Biogeography, 39(12), 2292-2302.
DOI Scopus25 WoS21
2012 Carpenter, R., Jordan, G., Macphail, M., & Hill, R. (2012). Near-tropical Early Eocene terrestrial temperatures at the Australo-Antarctic margin, western Tasmania. Geology, 40(3), 267-270.
DOI Scopus28 WoS27
2012 Biffin, E., Brodribb, T., Hill, R., Thomas, P., & Lowe, A. (2012). Leaf evolution in Southern Hemisphere conifers tracks the angiosperm ecological radiation. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London Series B-Biological Sciences, 279(1727), 341-348.
DOI Scopus43 WoS29 Europe PMC11
2011 Carpenter, R., Goodwin, M., Hill, R., & Kanold, K. (2011). Silcrete plant fossils from Lightning Ridge, New South Wales: new evidence for climate change and monsoon elements in the Australian Cenozoic. Australian Journal of Botany, 59(5), 399-425.
DOI Scopus13 WoS12
2011 Jordan, G., Carpenter, R., Bannister, J., Lee, D., Mildenhall, D., & Hill, R. (2011). High conifer diversity in Oligo-Miocene New Zealand. Australian Systematic Botany, 24(2), 121-136.
DOI Scopus21 WoS19
2010 Biffin, E., Hill, R., & Lowe, A. (2010). Did Kauri (Agathis: Araucariaceae) really survive the Oligocene drowning of New Zealand?. Systematic Biology, 59(5), 594-601.
DOI Scopus41 WoS38 Europe PMC22
2010 Read, J., Hill, R., & Hope, G. (2010). Contrasting responses to water deficits of Nothofagus species from tropical New Guinea and high-latitude temperate forests: can rainfall regimes constrain latitudinal range?. Journal of Biogeography, 37(10), 1962-1976.
DOI Scopus7 WoS7
2010 Paull, R., & Hill, R. (2010). Early Oligocene Callitris and Fitzroya (cupressaceaea) from Tasmania. American Journal of Botany, 97(5), 809-820.
DOI Scopus12 WoS11 Europe PMC1
2010 Carpenter, R., Jordan, G., Lee, D., & Hill, R. (2010). Leaf fossils of Banksia (Proteaceae) from New Zealand: An Australian abroad. American Journal of Botany, 97(2), 288-297.
DOI Scopus23 WoS22 Europe PMC1
2009 Afshar Mohammadian, M., Hill, R., & Watling, J. (2009). Stomatal plugs and their impact on fungal invasion in Agathis robusta. Australian Journal of Botany, 57(5), 389-395.
DOI Scopus5 WoS5 Europe PMC1
2009 Paull, R., & Hill, R. (2009). Libocedrus macrofossils from Tasmania (Australia). International Journal of Plant Sciences, 170(3), 381-399.
DOI Scopus5 WoS5
2008 Hill, R., Lewis, T., Carpenter, R., & Whang, S. (2008). Agathis (Araucariaceae) macrofossils from Cainozoic sediments in south-eastern Australia. Australian Systematic Botany, 21(3), 162-177.
DOI Scopus13 WoS12
2008 McLoughlin, S., Carpenter, R., Jordan, G., & Hill, R. (2008). Seed ferns survived the end-cretaceous mass extinction in Tasmania. American Journal of Botany, 95(4), 465-471.
DOI Scopus46 WoS45 Europe PMC4
2008 Paull, R., & Hill, R. (2008). Oligocene Austrocedrus from Tasmania (Australia): Comparisons with Austrocedrus chilensis. International Journal of Plant Sciences, 169(2), 315-330.
DOI Scopus8 WoS8
2007 Afshar Mohammadian, M., Watling, J., & Hill, R. (2007). The impact of epicuticular wax on gas-exchange and photoinhibition in Leucadendron lanigerum (Proteaceae). Acta Oecologica-International Journal of Ecology, 31(1), 93-101.
DOI Scopus26 WoS21
2007 Carpenter, R., Jordan, G., & Hill, R. (2007). A toothed lauraceae leaf from the early Eocene of Tasmania, Australia. International Journal of Plant Sciences, 168(8), 1191-1198.
DOI Scopus23 WoS22
2006 Guerin, G., & Hill, R. (2006). Plant macrofossil evidence for the environment associated with the Riversleigh fauna. Australian Journal of Botany, 54(8), 717-731.
DOI Scopus12 WoS9
2006 Carpenter, R., Hill, R., & Scriven, L. (2006). Palmately lobed Proteaceae leaf fossils from the Middle Eocene of South Australia. International Journal of Plant Sciences, 167(5), 1049-1060.
DOI Scopus5 WoS5
2005 Tait, C., Daniels, C., & Hill, R. (2005). Changes in species assemblages within the Adelaide metropolitan area, Australia, 1836-2002. Ecological Applications, 15(1), 346-359.
DOI Scopus94 WoS78
2005 Brodribb, T., Holbrook, N., & Hill, R. (2005). Seedling growth in conifers and angiosperms: impacts of contrasting xylem structure. Australian Journal of Botany, 53(8), 749-755.
DOI Scopus20 WoS17
2005 Carpenter, R., Hill, R., & Jordan, G. (2005). Leaf cuticular morphology links Platanaceae and Proteaceae. International Journal of Plant Sciences, 166(5), 843-855.
DOI Scopus42 WoS38
2005 Read, J., Hope, G., & Hill, R. (2005). Phytogeography and climate analysis of Nothofagus subgenus Brassospora in New Guinea and New Caledonia. Australian Journal of Botany, 53(4), 297-312.
DOI Scopus11 WoS12
2004 Mill, R., & Hill, R. (2004). Validations of the names of seven Podocarpaceae macrofossils. Taxon, 53(4), 1043-1046.
DOI Scopus5 WoS5
2004 Paull, R., & Hill, R. (2004). Why were the leaves of tertiary Nothofagus subgenus Brassospora species serrate margined?. Australian Biologist, 17(1), 34-53.
2004 Hill, R. (2004). The macrofossil record of the conifer family cupressaceae in Australia. Australian Biologist, 17(1), 23-27.
2004 Carpenter, R., Hill, R., Greenwood, D., Partridge, A., & Banks, M. (2004). No snow in the mountains: early eocene plant fossils from Hotham Heights, Victoria, Australia. Australian Journal of Botany, 52(6), 685-718.
DOI Scopus24 WoS27
2004 Hill, R. (2004). Origins of the southeastern Australian vegetation. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London Series B-Biological Sciences, 359(1450), 1537-1549.
DOI Scopus97 WoS92 Europe PMC24
2004 Whang, S., Kim, K., & Hill, R. (2004). Cuticle micromorphology of leaves of Pinus (Pinaceae) from North America. Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, 144(3), 303-320.
DOI Scopus13 WoS12
2003 Brodribb, T., & Hill, R. (2003). Implications of leaf and shoot physiology in Podocarpaceae. Acta Horticulturae, 1(615), 173-174.
DOI Scopus1
2003 Hill, R., & Brodribb, T. (2003). Evolution of confier foilage in the southern hemisphere. Acta Horticulturae, 1(615), 53-58.
DOI Scopus2 WoS1
2003 Paull, R., & Hill, R. (2003). Nothofagus kiandrensis (Nothofagaceae subgenus Brassospora), a new macrofossil leaf species from Miocene sediments at Kiandra, New South Wales. Australian Systematic Botany, 16(4), 549-559.
DOI Scopus8 WoS8
2003 Hill, R., & Paull, R. (2003). Fitzroya (Cupressaceae) macrofossils from Cenozoic sediments in Tasmania, Australia. Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology, 126(1-2), 145-152.
DOI Scopus4 WoS6
2003 Steane, D., Wilson, K., & Hill, R. (2003). Using matK sequence data to unravel the phylogeny of Casuarinaceae. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, 28(1), 47-59.
DOI Scopus37 WoS35 Europe PMC16
2003 Guerin, G., & Hill, R. (2003). Gymnostoma tasmanianum sp nov., a fossil Casuarinaceae from the Early Oligocene of Little Rapid River, Tasmania, Australia. International Journal of Plant Sciences, 164(4), 629-634.
DOI Scopus6 WoS7
2002 Jordan, G., & Hill, R. (2002). Cenozoic plant macrofossil sites of Tasmania. Royal Society of Tasmania, Hobart. Papers and Proceedings, 136, 127-139.
DOI
2002 Hill, R. (2002). Book reviews - Plant Fossils. Nomen Nudum (Online Edition), 27(2), 6-7.
2002 Whang, S., Choi, K., Hill, R., & Pak, J. H. (2002). A morphometric analysis of infraspecific taxa within the Ixeris chinensis complex (Asteraceae, Lactuceae). Botanical Bulletin of Academia Sinica, 43(2), 131-138.
Scopus6 WoS1
2001 Hill, R. (2001). Preface to 'Evolution, Extinction and Biogeography in Gondwana'. Australian Journal of Botany, 49(3), I-II.
DOI WoS2
2001 Hill, R. (2001). The Cenozoic macrofossil record of the Cupressaceae in the Southern Hemisphere. Acta Palaeobotanica, 41(2), 123-132.
Scopus6
2001 Swenson, U., Hill, R., & McLoughlin, S. (2001). Biogeography of Nothofagus supports the sequence of Gondwana break-up. Taxon, 50(4), 1025-1041.
DOI Scopus53 WoS56
2001 Hill, R., & Brodribb, T. (2001). Macrofossil evidence for the onset of xeromorphy in Australian Casuarinaceae and tribe Banksieae (Proteaceae). Journal of Mediterranean Ecology, 2, 127-136.
2001 Hill, R. (2001). Book Review - Flora of Australia volumes 17A. Proteaceae 2: Grevillea and 17B. Proteaceae 3: Hakea to Dryandra. New Zealand Journal of Botany, 39, 175-176.
2001 Hill, R., Macphail, M., & Jordan, G. (2001). Macrofossils associated with the fossil fern spore Cyatheacidites annulatus and their significance for Southern hemisphere biogeography. Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology, 116(03-Apr), 195-202.
DOI Scopus15 WoS13
2001 Hill, R. (2001). Nothofagus cupules from Oligocene-Early Miocene sediments at Balfour, Northwest Tasmania, Australia. International Journal of Plant Sciences, 162(3), 683-690.
DOI Scopus7 WoS7
2001 Swenson, U., Backlund, A., McLoughlin, S., & Hill, R. (2001). Nothofagus biogeography revisited with special emphasis on the enigmatic distribution of subgenus Brassospora in New Caledonia. Cladistics-The International Journal of the Willi Hennig Society, 17(1 Part 1), 28-47.
DOI Scopus88 WoS85
2001 Whang, S., Pak, J., Hill, R., & Kim, K. (2001). Cuticle micromorphology of leaves of Pinus (Pinaceae) from Mexico and Central America. Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, 135(4), 349-373.
DOI Scopus18 WoS16
2001 Hill, R., & Christophel, D. (2001). Two new species of Dacrydium (Podocarpaceae) based on vegetative fossils from Middle Eocene sediments at Nelly Creek, South Australia. Australian Systematic Botany, 14(2), 193-205.
DOI Scopus11 WoS10
2001 Barnes, R., Hill, R., & Bradford, J. (2001). The history of Cunoniaceae in Australia from macrofossil evidence. Australian Journal of Botany, 49(3), 301-320.
DOI Scopus16 WoS21
2001 Swenson, U., & Hill, R. (2001). Most parsimonious areagrams versus fossils: the case of Nothofagus (Nothofagaceae). Australian Journal of Botany, 49(3), 367-376.
DOI Scopus15 WoS15
2001 Hill, R. (2001). Biogeography, evolution and palaeoecology of Nothofagus (Nothofagaceae): the contribution of the fossil record. Australian Journal of Botany, 49(3), 321-332.
DOI Scopus49 WoS48
2001 Hill, R., & Farrer, S. (2001). The Gondwanan Connection. Evolution, Extinction and Biogeography in Gondwana. Australian Journal of Botany, 49(3), 271-409.
2001 Hill, R. (2001). Australian Journal of Botany: Preface. Australian Journal of Botany, 49(3).
2000 McGowran, B., Archer, M., Bock, P., Darragh, T., Godthelp, H., Hageman, S., . . . Warne, M. (2000). Australasian palaeobiogeography: the Palaeogene and Neogene record. Association of Australasian Palaeontologists Memoirs, 23, 405-470.
2000 Hill, R. (2000). The origins and early evolution of angiosperms. Australian Biologist, 13(3), 76-89.
2000 Barnes, R., Jordan, G., Hill, R., & McCoull, C. (2000). A common boundary between distinct northern and southern morphotypes in two unrelated Tasmanian rainforest species. Australian Journal of Botany, 48(4), 481-491.
DOI Scopus9 WoS8
2000 Swenson, U., Hill, R., & McLoughlin, S. (2000). Ancestral area analysis of Nothofagus (Nothofagaceae) and its congruence with the fossil record. Australian Systematic Botany, 13(4), 469-478.
DOI Scopus25 WoS21
2000 Pole, M., Hill, R., & Harwood, D. (2000). Eocene plant macrofossils from erratics, McMurdo Sound, Antarctica. Antarctic Research Book Series, 76, 243-251.
2000 Brodribb, T., & Hill, R. (2000). Increases in water potential gradient reduce xylem conductivity in whole plants. Evidence from a low-pressure conductivity method. Plant Physiology, 123(3), 1021-1028.
DOI Scopus38 WoS34 Europe PMC7
2000 Hill, R., & Whang, S. (2000). Dacrycarpus (Podoarcpaceae) macrofossils from Miocene sediments at Elands, Eastern Australia. Australian Systematic Botany, 13(3), 395-408.
DOI Scopus13 WoS10
2000 Hill, R. (2000). Attempting to define the impossible: a commentary on 'Australian Rainforests: Islands of Green in a Land of Fire'. Geographical Research, 38(3), 320-326.
1999 Jordan, G., & Hill, R. (1999). The Phylogenetic affinities of Nothofacus (Nothofagaceae) Leaf Fossils based on combined molecular and morphological data. International Journal of Plant Sciences, 160(6), 1177-1188.
DOI Scopus44 WoS42
1999 Whang, S., & Hill, R. (1999). Late Palaeocene Cupressaceae Macrofossils at Lake Bungarby, New South Wales. Australian Systematic Botany, 12(2), 241-254.
DOI Scopus9 WoS7
1999 Hill, R., & Brodribb, T. (1999). TURNER REVIEW No. 2Southern Conifers in Time and Space. Australian Journal of Botany, 47(5), 639-696.
WoS116
1999 Hill, R., & Carpenter, R. (1999). Ginkgo Leaves from Paleogene Sediments in Tasmania. Australian Journal of Botany, 47(5), 717-724.
Scopus28 WoS24
1999 Barnes, R., & Hill, R. (1999). Macrofossils of Callicoma and Codia (Cunoniaceae) from Australian Cainozoic sediments. Australian Systematic Botany, 12(5), 647-670.
DOI Scopus16 WoS14
1999 Kim, K., Whang, S., & Hill, R. (1999). Cuticle micromorphology of leaves of Pinus (Pinaceae) in east and south-east Asia. Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, 129(1), 55-74.
DOI Scopus19 WoS17
1999 Barnes, R., & Hill, R. (1999). Ceratopetalum fruits from Australian Cainozoic sediments and their significance for petal evolution in the genus. Australian Systematic Botany, 12(5), 635-645.
DOI Scopus12 WoS13
1999 Hill, R. S., & Scriven, L. J. (1999). Falcatifolium (Podocarpaceae) macrofossils from Paleogene sediments in south-eastern Australia: a reassessment. Australian Systematic Botany, 11(5-6), 711-720.
DOI Scopus11 WoS10
1999 Brodribb, T., & Hill, R. (1999). The importance of xylem constraints in the distribution of conifer species. New Phytologist, 143(2), 365-372.
DOI Scopus110 WoS94
1999 Hill, R., & Brodribb, T. (1999). Southern conifers in time and space. Australian Journal of Botany, 47(5), 639-696.
Scopus128
1999 Anderson, J., Anderson, H., Archangelsky, S., Bamford, M., Chandra, S., Dettmann, M., . . . Rösler, O. (1999). Patterns of Gondwana plant colonisation and diversification. Journal of African Earth Sciences, 28(1), 145-167.
DOI Scopus95
1998 Brodribb, T., & Hill, R. (1998). The photosynthetic drought physiology of a diverse group of southern hemisphere conifer species is correlated with minimum seasonal rainfall. Functional Ecology, 12(3), 465-471.
DOI Scopus67 WoS62
1997 Brodribb, T., & Hill, R. (1997). Light response characteristics of a morphologically diverse group of southern hemisphere conifers as measured by chlorophyll fluorescence. Oecologia, 110(1), 10-17.
DOI Scopus34 WoS27 Europe PMC9
1997 Hill, R. S., & Kershaw, A. P. (1997). Australian palaeoclimates: Refinement of estimates from palaeobotanical data - Preface. AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF BOTANY, 45(3), U4-U5.
1997 Hill, R., & Scriven, L. (1997). Palaeoclimate across an altitudinal gradient in the Oligocene-Miocene of northern Tasmania: An investigation of nearest living relative analysis. Australian Journal of Botany, 45(3), 493-505.
Scopus16 WoS15
1997 Brodribb, T., & Hill, R. S. (1997). Imbricacy and stomatal wax plugs reduce maximum leaf conductance in Southern Hemisphere conifers. Australian Journal of Botany, 45(4), 657-668.
DOI Scopus43 WoS41
1996 Hill, R. S., & Whang, S. S. (1996). A new species of Fitzroya (Cupressaceae) from Oligocene sediments in north-western Tasmania. Australian Systematic Botany, 9(6), 867-875.
DOI Scopus17 WoS16
1996 Jordan, G., Macphail, M., & Hill, R. (1996). A fertile pinnule fragment with spores of Dicksonia from Early Oligocene sediments in Tasmania. Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology, 92(3-4), 245-252.
DOI Scopus8 WoS8
1996 Jordan, G., & Hill, R. (1996). The fossil record of the epacridaceae. Annals of Botany, 77(4), 341-346.
DOI Scopus19 WoS21
1996 Francis, J., & Hill, R. (1996). Fossil plants from the pliocene sirius group, transantarctic mountains: Evidence for climate from growth rings and fossil leaves. Palaios, 11(4), 389-396.
DOI Scopus60 WoS53
1996 Blake, J., & Hill, R. (1996). An examination of the drought and frost tolerance of Banksia marginata (proteaceae) as an explanation of its current widespread occurrence in Tasmania. Australian Journal of Botany, 44(3), 265-281.
DOI Scopus7 WoS5
1996 Hill, R., Harwood, D., & Webb, P. (1996). Nothofagus beardmorensis (Nothofagaceae), a new species based on leaves from the pliocene sirius group, Transantarctic Mountains, Antarctica. Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology, 94(1-2), 11-24.
DOI Scopus43 WoS42
1996 Taylor, F., & Hill, R. S. (1996). A phylogenetic analysis of the Eucryphiaceae. Australian Systematic Botany, 9(5), 735-748.
DOI Scopus18 WoS17
1996 Scriven, L., & Hill, R. (1996). Relationships among Tasmanian Tertiary Nothofagus (Nothofagaceae) populations. Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, 121(4), 345-364.
DOI Scopus21 WoS22
1996 Hill, R., & Jordan, G. (1996). Macrofossils as indicators of Plio-Pleistocene climates in Tasmania and Antarctica. Papers and Proceedings - Royal Society of Tasmania, 130(2), 9-15.
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1995 Scriven, L., & Hill, R. (1995). Macrofossil casuarinaceae:Their identification and the oldest macrofossil record, gymnostoma antiquum sp. nov., from the late paleocene of new south wales, australia. Australian Systematic Botany, 8(6), 1035-1053.
DOI Scopus21 WoS22
1995 Whang, S., & Hill, R. (1995). Phytolith analysis in leaves of extant and fossil populations of nothofagus subgenus lophozonia. Australian Systematic Botany, 8(6), 1055-1065.
DOI Scopus6 WoS5
1995 Jordan, G., MacPhail, M., Barnes, R., & Hill, R. (1995). An early to middle pleistocene flora of subalpine affinities in Lowland Western Tasmania. Australian Journal of Botany, 43(2), 231-242.
DOI Scopus17 WoS18
1995 Scriven, L., McLoughlin, S., & Hill, R. (1995). Nothofagus plicata (Nothofagaceae), a new deciduous Eocene macrofossil species, from southern continental Australia. Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology, 86(3-4), 199-209.
DOI Scopus23 WoS22
1995 Jordan, G., & Hill, R. (1995). Oligocene leaves of epacridaceae from little rapid river, tasmania, and theidentification of fossil epacridaceae leaves. Australian Systematic Botany, 8(1), 71-83.
DOI Scopus9 WoS12
1995 Hill, R., & Scriven, L. (1995). The angiosperm-dominated woody vegetation of Antarctica: a review. Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology, 86(3-4), 175-198.
DOI Scopus61 WoS52
1994 Carpenter, R., Jordan, G., & Hill, R. (1994). Banksieaephyllum taylorii (Proteaceae) from the late paleocene of new south wales and its relevance to the origin of australia’s scleromorphie flora. Australian Systematic Botany, 7(4), 385-392.
DOI Scopus30
1994 Hill, R. (1994). Nothofagus smithtonensis (Nothofagaceae), a new macrofossil species from Oligocene sediments in northwest Tasmania, Australia, and its phylogenetic significance. Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology, 80(1-2), 115-121.
DOI Scopus11 WoS15
1994 JORDAN, G., & HILL, R. (1994). Past and present variability in leaf length of evergreen members of Nothofagus subgenus Lophozonia related to ecology and population dynamics. New Phytologist, 127(2), 377-390.
DOI Scopus27 WoS24
1994 Hill, R., & Pole, M. (1994). Two new species of Pterostoma R.S. Hill from Cenozoic sediments in Australasia. Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology, 80(1-2), 123-130.
DOI Scopus14 WoS16
1994 Macphail, M., & Hill, R. (1994). K-Ar dated palynofloras in Tasmania 1: early Oligocene, Proteacidites tuberculatus zone sediments, Wilmot Dam, northwestern Tasmania. Papers & Proceedings - Royal Society of Tasmania, 128, 1-15.
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1993 COLHOUN, E., BENGER, S., FITZSIMONS, S., VAN DE GEER, G., & HILL, R. (1993). Quaternary Organic Deposit from Newton Creek Valley, Western Tasmania. Australian Geographical Studies, 31(1), 26-38.
DOI Scopus7
1993 Hill, R. (1993). The southern connection—an integrated approach. Australian Systematic Botany, 6(5), 377-389.
DOI Scopus1
1993 MacPhail, M., Jordan, G., & Hill, R. (1993). Key periods in the evolution of the flora and vegetation in Western Tasmania I. The early-middle pleistocene. Australian Journal of Botany, 41(6), 673-707.
DOI Scopus48 WoS47
1993 Hill, R., & Merrifield, H. (1993). An early tertiary macroflora from west dale, Southwestern Australia. Alcheringa, 17(4), 285-326.
DOI Scopus56 WoS51
1993 Brodribb, T., & Hill, R. (1993). A physiological comparison of leaves and phyllodes in Acacia melanoxylon. Australian Journal of Botany, 41(3), 293-305.
DOI Scopus39 WoS36
1993 Pole, M., Hill, R., Greer, N., & Macphail, M. (1993). The oligocene berwick quarry flora — rainforest in а drying environment. Australian Systematic Botany, 6(5), 399-427.
DOI Scopus34
1993 Hill, R., & Jordan, G. (1993). The evolutionary history of nothofagus (Nothofagaceae). Australian Systematic Botany, 6(2), 111-126.
DOI Scopus94
1993 Wells, A., & Hill, R. (1993). Epiphyllous microorganisms as palaeoclimate estimators:The developmental sequence of fungal ‘germlings’ on their living host. Australian Systematic Botany, 6(5), 377-386.
DOI Scopus5
1993 Hill, R., Jordan, G., & Carpenter, R. (1993). Taxodiaceous macrofossils from tertiary and quaternary sediments in tasmania. Australian Systematic Botany, 6(3), 237-249.
DOI Scopus41
1992 Hill, R., & Pole, M. (1992). Leaf and shoot morphology of extant afrocarpus, nageia and retrophyllum (Podocarpaceae) species, and species with similar leaf arrangement, from tertiary sediments in australasia. Australian Systematic Botany, 5(3), 337-358.
DOI Scopus44
1992 Hill, R. (1992). Nothofagus: Evolution from a southern perspective. Trends in Ecology and Evolution, 7(6), 190-194.
DOI Scopus47 WoS44 Europe PMC9
1991 HILL, R. (1991). Tertiary Nothofagus (Fagaceae) macrofossils from Tasmania and Antarctica and their bearing on the evolution of the genus. Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, 105(1), 73-112.
DOI Scopus67 WoS63
1991 Macphail, M., Hill, R., Forsyth, S., & Wells, P. (1991). A late oligocene–early miocene cool climate flora in Tasmania. Alcheringa, 15(2), 87-106.
DOI Scopus30 WoS25
1991 HILL, R., & READ, J. (1991). A revised infrageneric classification of Nothofagus (Fagaceae). Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, 105(1), 37-72.
DOI Scopus118 WoS105
1991 Hill, R. (1991). Leaves of eucryphia (Eucryphiaceae) from tertiary sediments in south-eastern australia. Australian Systematic Botany, 4(3), 481-497.
DOI Scopus29
1991 Jordan, G., & Hill, R. (1991). Two new banksia species from pleistocene sediments in western tasmania. Australian Systematic Botany, 4(3), 499-511.
DOI Scopus15
1991 Jordan, G., Carpenter, R., & Hill, R. (1991). Late pleistocene vegetation and climate near melaleuca inlet, South-Western Tasmania. Australian Journal of Botany, 39(4), 315-333.
DOI Scopus28 WoS21
1991 Hill, R., & Carpenter, R. (1991). Evolution of acmopyle and d aery carpus (Podocarpaceae) foliage as inferred from macrofossils in south-eastern australia. Australian Systematic Botany, 4(3), 449-479.
DOI Scopus71
1990 Read, J., Hope, G., & Hill, R. (1990). The dynamics of some Nothofagus-dominated rain forests in Papua New Guinea. Journal of Biogeography, 17(2), 185-204.
DOI Scopus18
1990 Hill, R. (1990). Araucaria (Araucariaceae) species from australian tertiary sediments — a micromorphological study. Australian Systematic Botany, 3(2), 203-220.
DOI Scopus25
1990 Hill, R. (1990). Tertiary Proteaceae in Australia: a re-investigation of Banksia adunca and Dryandra urniformis. Proceedings - Royal Society of Victoria, 102(1), 23-28.
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1990 FITZSIMONS, S., COLHOUN, E., GEER, G., & HILL, R. (1990). Definition and character of the Regency Interglacial and Early‐Middle Pleistocene stratigraphy in the King Valley, western Tasmania, Australia. Boreas, 19(1), 1-15.
DOI Scopus20 WoS20
1990 Pickett, J. W., Smith, N., Bishop, P. M., Hill, R. S., Macphail, M. K., & Holmes, W. B. K. (1990). A stratigraphic evaluation of Ettingshausen's New England Tertiary plant localities. Australian Journal of Earth Sciences, 37(3), 293-303.
DOI Scopus12 WoS9
1989 Colhoun, E. A., van de Geer, G., Hill, R. S., & Bird, T. (1989). Interglacial pollen and plant macrofossils from Langdon River, western Tasmania. New Phytologist, 111(3), 531-548.
DOI Scopus19 WoS16
1989 Hill, R. (1989). New species of phyllocladus (Podocarpaceae) macrofossils from southeastern Australia. Alcheringa, 13(3), 193-208.
DOI Scopus28 WoS24
1989 Hill, R., Forsyth, S., & Green, F. (1989). A new genus of osmundaceous stem from the upper Triassic of Tasmania. Palaeontology, 32(2), 287-296.
Scopus15 WoS12
1989 Hill, R., & Carpenter, R. (1989). Tertiary gymnosperms from Tasmania: Cupressaceae. Alcheringa, 13(2), 89-102.
DOI Scopus30 WoS28
1989 Hill, R. (1989). Early Tertiary leaves of the Menispermaceae from Nerriga, New South Wales. Alcheringa, 13(1), 37-44.
DOI Scopus6 WoS9
1989 Read, J., & Hill, R. (1989). The response of some Australian temperate rain forest tree species to freezing temperatures and its biogeographical significance. Journal of Biogeography, 16(1), 21-27.
DOI Scopus23 WoS25
1989 Wells, P., & Hill, R. (1989). Leaf morphology of the imbricate-leaved podocarpaceae. Australian Systematic Botany, 2(4), 369-386.
DOI Scopus49
1989 Wells, P., & Hill, R. (1989). Fossil imbricate-leaved podocarpaceae from tertiary sediments in tasmania. Australian Systematic Botany, 2(4), 387-423.
DOI Scopus49
1988 Hill, R. S. (1988). Australian Tertiary angiosperm and gymnosperm leaf remains - an updated catalogue. Alcheringa, 12(3), 207-219.
DOI Scopus15 WoS14
1988 Hill, R., Read, J., & Busby, J. (1988). The temperature-dependence of photosynthesis of some Australian temperate rainforest trees and its biogeographical significance. Journal of Biogeography, 15(3), 431-449.
DOI Scopus51 WoS46
1988 Read, J., & Hill, R. S. (1988). Comparative responses to temperature of the major canopy species of Tasmanian cool temperate rainforest and their ecological significance. I. Foliar frost-resistance. Australian Journal of Botany, 36(2), 131-143.
DOI Scopus26 WoS26
1988 Read, J., & Hill, R. (1988). The dynamics of some rainforest associations in Tasmania. Journal of Ecology, 76(2), 558-584.
DOI Scopus47 WoS47
1988 Hill, R. S. (1988). A re-investigation of Nothofagus muelleri (Ett.) Paterson and Cinnamomum nuytsii Ett. from the Late Eocene of Vegetable Creek. Alcheringa, 12(3), 221-231.
DOI Scopus23 WoS18
1988 Hill, R. (1988). Tertiary isoetes from Tasmania. Alcheringa, 12(2), 157-162.
DOI Scopus13 WoS6
1988 Shim, K., Hill, R., & Lewis, R. (1988). Fluctuating lift forces and pressure distributions due to vortex shedding in tube banks. International Journal of Heat and Fluid Flow, 9(2), 131-146.
DOI Scopus2
1988 HILL, R., & CHRISTOPHEL, D. (1988). Tertiary leaves of the tribe Banksieae (Proteaceae) from south‐eastern Australia. Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, 97(2), 205-227.
DOI Scopus46 WoS38
1988 Carpenter, R., & Hill, R. (1988). Early tertiary Lomatia (Proteaceae) macrofossils from Tasmania, Australia. Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology, 56(1-2), 141-150.
DOI Scopus25 WoS25
1987 Hill, R. (1987). Discovery of Nothofagus fruits corresponding to an important Tertiary pollen type. Nature, 327(6117), 56-58.
DOI Scopus29 WoS26
1987 Kovar, J., Campbell, J., & Hill, R. (1987). Nothofagus ninnisiana (Unger) Oliver from Waikato Coal Measures (Eocene-Oligocene) at Drury, Auckland, New Zealand. New Zealand Journal of Botany, 25(1), 79-85.
DOI Scopus9 WoS6
1987 Hill, R., & Read, J. (1987). Endemism in Tasmanian cool temperate rainforest: alternative hypotheses. Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, 95(2), 113-124.
DOI Scopus19 WoS17
1987 Hill, R. S., & Bigwood, A. J. (1987). Tertiary gymnosperms from Tasmania: Araucariaceae. Alcheringa, 11(4), 325-335.
DOI Scopus37 WoS34
1987 Wilson, M. A., Verheyen, T. V., Vassallo, A. M., Hill, R. S., & Perry, G. J. (1987). Selective loss of carbohydrates from plant remains during coalification. Organic Geochemistry, 11(4), 265-271.
DOI Scopus25 WoS24
1986 Hill, R. S., & Gibson, N. (1986). Distribution of potential macrofossils in Lake Dobson, Tasmania. Journal of Ecology, 74(2), 373-384.
DOI Scopus29 WoS27
1986 Hill, R. S. (1986). Lauraceous leaves from the Eocene of Nerriga, New South Wales. Alcheringa, 10(4), 327-351.
DOI Scopus50 WoS50
1985 READ, J., & HILL, R. (1985). PHOTOSYNTHETIC RESPONSES TO LIGHT OF AUSTRALIAN AND CHILEAN SPECIES OF NOTHOFAGUS AND THEIR RELEVANCE TO THE RAINFOREST DYNAMICS. New Phytologist, 101(4), 731-742.
DOI Scopus49 WoS57
1985 Hill, R., & MacPhail, M. (1985). A Fossil Flora From Rafted Plio-Pleistocene Mudstones at Regatta Point, Tasmania.. Australian Journal of Botany, 33(5), 497-517.
DOI Scopus57 WoS51
1985 Bigwood, A., & Hill, R. (1985). Tertiary araucarian macrofossils from Tasmania. Australian Journal of Botany, 33(6), 645-656.
DOI Scopus36 WoS36
1985 Read, J., & Hill, R. (1985). Dynamics of Nothofagus-dominated rainforest on mainland Australia and lowland Tasmania. Vegetatio, 63(2), 67-78.
DOI Scopus33 WoS40
1984 Hill, R. (1984). Tertiary nothofagus macrofossils from Cethana, Tasmania. Alcheringa, 8(1), 81-86.
DOI Scopus38 WoS34
1984 Hill, R. S., & Read, J. (1984). Post-fire regeneration of rainforest and mixed forest in western Tasmania. Australian Journal of Botany, 32(5), 481-493.
DOI Scopus27 WoS22
1983 Hill, R. (1983). Nothofagus macrofossils from the Tertiary of Tasmania. Alcheringa, 7(3), 169-183.
DOI Scopus34 WoS31
1983 Hill, R. S. (1983). Evolution of Nothofagus cunninghamii and its relationship to N. moorei as inferred from Tasmanian macrofossils. Australian Journal of Botany, 31(5), 453-465.
DOI Scopus33 WoS36
1983 Read, J., & Hill, R. S. (1983). Rainforest invasion onto Tasmanian old-fields. Australian Journal of Ecology, 8(2), 149-161.
DOI Scopus24 WoS22
1983 Hill, R., & Macphail, M. (1983). Reconstruction of the Oligocene vegetation at Pioneer, northeast Tasmania. Alcheringa, 7(4), 281-299.
DOI Scopus73 WoS70
1983 Macphail, M., & Hill, R. (1983). Cool temperate rainforest in Tasmania: a reply.. Search, 14(7-8), 186-187.
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1982 Hill, R. S. (1982). Rainforest fire in western Tasmania. Australian Journal of Botany, 30(6), 583-589.
DOI Scopus12 WoS13
1981 Hill, R. S. (1981). Consequences of long-distance dispersal of plant macrofossils. New Zealand Journal of Botany, 19(2), 241-242.
DOI Scopus7 WoS7
1980 Hill, R. S. (1980). A stopping rule for partitioning dendrograms. Botanical Gazette, 141(3), 321-324.
DOI WoS20
1980 Hill, R. S. (1980). A numerical taxonomic approach to the study of angiosperm leaves. Botanical Gazette, 141(2), 213-229.
DOI WoS32
1980 Hill, R. S. (1980). Three new Eocene cycads from eastern Australia. Australian Journal of Botany, 28(1), 105-122.
DOI Scopus40 WoS39
1978 Hill, R. (1978). Two new species of Bowenia Hook, ex Hook, f. from the eocene of eastern Australia. Australian Journal of Botany, 26(6), 837-846.
DOI Scopus27

Book Chapters

Year Citation
2013 Weston, P., & Hill, R. (2013). Southern (Austral) Ecosystems. In Encyclopedia of Biodiversity: Second Edition (pp. 612-619).
DOI Scopus4
2010 Read, J., Hill, R., Hope, G., & Carpenter, R. (2010). The contrasting biology of tropical versus temperate Nothofagus species and its relevance to interpretations of Cenozoic rainforest history in southeast Australia. In S. O'Connor (Ed.), Altered Ecologies: Fire, climate and human influence on terrestrial landscapes (32 ed., pp. 15-31). Australia: ANU E Press.
2006 Hill, R., & Brodribb, T. (2006). The evolution of Australia's living biota. In P. Attiwill, & B. Wilson (Eds.), The evolution of Australia¿s living biota (2nd ed) (2 ed., pp. 19-40). South Melbourne, Victoria; Australia: Oxford University Press.
2006 Hopper, S., Dixon, K., & Hill, R. (2006). Australian seeds through time. In Australian seeds: A guide to their collection, identification and biology (pp. 5-10). Collingwood, Victoria: CSIRO Publishing.
2005 Stockey, R., Hill, R., Kvacek, J., Rothwell, G., & Kvacek, Z. (2005). Fossil record of Cupressaceae s.lat... In Aljos Farjon (Ed.), A monograph of Cupressaceae and Sciadopitys (pp. 54-68). Kew, UK: Royal Botanic Gardens.
2005 Tait, C., Daniels, C., & Hill, R. (2005). The urban ark 1: The historical evolution of the plant community. In C. Daniels, & C. Tait (Eds.), Adelaide - Nature of a city: The ecology of a dynamic city from 1836 to 2036 (pp. 87-108). Adelaide: BioCity: Centre for Urban Habitats.
2004 Brodribb, T., & Hill, R. (2004). The rise and fall of the Podocarpaceae in Australia – a physiological explanation. In A. R. Hemsley, & I. Poole (Eds.), The evolution of plant physiology : from whole plants to ecosystems (pp. 381-399). Amsterdam ; Boston: Elsevier Academic Press.
DOI Scopus23
2003 Hill, R., & Brodribb, T. (2003). The evolution of Australia’s living biota. In Ecology: An Australian perspective (pp. 13-33). South Melbourne, Victoria: Oxford University Press.
2002 Macphail, M., & Hill, R. (2002). Palaeobotany of the Poaceae. In K. Mallett, & A. Orchard (Eds.), Flora of Australia - Vol 43 Poaceae 1 - Introduction and Atlas (pp. 37-70). PO Box 1139 Collingwood Vic 3066: CSIRO Publishing.
2001 Hill, R., & Weston, P. (2001). Southern (Austral) ecosystems. In Encyclopedia of biodiversity (pp. 361-370). Academic Press.
2001 Hill, R. (2001). Evolution in Antarctica. In D. McGonical, & D. Woodworth (Eds.), The Complete Story of Antarctica (pp. 40-47). 22 Summit Rd, MNoble Park, Vic 3174: Global Book Publishing Pty Ltd.
2001 Macphail, M., & Hill, R. (2001). Fossil record of Acacia in Australia: Eocene to Recent. In Flora of Australia. vol. 11A, Mimosaceae, Acacia part 1 (pp. 13-29). Canberra, ACT, Australia: CSIRO Publishing.
2001 Hill, R. (2001). Terrestrial palaeobiogeography. In Palaeobiology II (pp. 454-459). Blackwell Science Ltd.
DOI Scopus1

Conference Papers

Year Citation
2006 Hill, R. (2006). Long term climate change and the evolution of trees in Australia. In TREENET Proceedings of the 7th National Street Tree Symposium, 7th-8th September, 2006 (pp. 16-22). Melbourne, Vic, Australia.
1998 Jordan, G., Carpenter, R., & Hill, R. (1998). The macrofossil record of Proteaceae in Tasmania: A review with new species. In Australian Systematic Botany Vol. 11 (pp. 465-501). UNIV MELBOURNE, MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA: C S I R O PUBLICATIONS.
DOI Scopus26 WoS30
1998 Hill, R. (1998). Fossil evidence for the onset of xeromorphy and scleromorphy in Australian Proteaceae. In Australian Systematic Botany Vol. 11 (pp. 391-400). UNIV MELBOURNE, MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA: C S I R O PUBLICATIONS.
DOI Scopus68 WoS66
1993 HILL, R. S., & TRUSWELL, E. M. (1993). NOTHOFAGUS FOSSILS IN THE SIRIUS GROUP, TRANSANTARCTIC MOUNTAINS - LEAVES AND POLLEN AND THEIR CLIMATIC IMPLICATIONS. In J. P. Kennett, & D. A. Warnke (Eds.), ANTARCTIC PALEOENVIRONMENT: A PERSPECTIVE ON GLOBAL CHANGE, PT 2 Vol. 60 (pp. 67-73). UNIV CALIF SANTA BARBARA, SANTA BARBARA, CA: AMER GEOPHYSICAL UNION.
WoS31

Current Higher Degree by Research Supervision (University of Adelaide)

Date Role Research Topic Program Degree Type Student Load Student Name
2018 Principal Supervisor Systematics and evolution of conifers Doctor of Philosophy Doctorate Full Time Mr Raees Khan
2018 Other The lives of animals and animals in our lives Doctor of Science Higher Doctorate Full Time Prof Christopher Daniels
2016 Principal Supervisor New insights into the evolutionary history of Nothofagus (Nothofagaceae) from molecular systematics and palynotaxonomy Doctor of Philosophy Doctorate Full Time Mrs Yelarney Kim Beer
2012 Other Doctor of Science Doctor of Science Higher Doctorate Full Time Dr Andrew Mark Carleton

Past Higher Degree by Research Supervision (University of Adelaide)

Date Role Research Topic Program Degree Type Student Load Student Name
2011 - 2015 Co-Supervisor Adaptation and acclimation of leaf traits to environmental change in time and space Doctor of Philosophy Doctorate Full Time Dr Kathryn Edwina Hill
2007 - 2008 Other Cenozoic Foraminifera in the Indo-Pacific Region: Stratigraphy, Oceanic and Environmental Change, and Faunal Impact Doctor of Science Higher Doctorate Full Time APrf Brian McGowran
2007 - 2012 Co-Supervisor Quaternary Climate Change and Podocarpus elatus Podocarpaceae Doctor of Philosophy Doctorate Full Time Mr Rohan Mellick
2004 - 2009 Co-Supervisor Molecular Systematics of the Lomandra Labill. Complex (Asparagales: Laxmanniaceae) Doctor of Philosophy Doctorate Part Time Mr Matthew Donnon
2002 - 2008 Principal Supervisor Systematics and Biology of Hemigenia R.Br.and Microcorys R.Br. (Lamiaceae) Doctor of Philosophy Doctorate Part Time Mr Greg Guerin
2002 - 2006 Principal Supervisor A Prototype Interactive Identification Tool to Fragmentary Wood from Eastern Central Australia, and its Application to Aboriginal Australian Ethnographic Artefacts Doctor of Philosophy Doctorate Full Time Ms Jennifer Barker
2002 - 2005 Co-Supervisor An Investigation of the Functions of Leaf Surface Modifications in the Protaeceae and Araucariaceae Doctor of Philosophy Doctorate Full Time Mr Mansour Afshar Mohammadian
2002 - 2007 Co-Supervisor A Reassessment of Taxonomic Diversity and Geographic Patterning in the Melanesian Mammal Fauna Doctor of Philosophy Doctorate Full Time Mr Kristofer Helgen
2002 - 2007 Principal Supervisor Cenozoic Cupressaceae Macrofossils from Southeastern Australia Comparisons with Extant Genera/Species Doctor of Philosophy Doctorate Part Time Dr Rosemary Paull
Position
Director, Environment Institute
Phone
83136807
Campus
North Terrace
Building
Benham Laboratories, floor G
Room Number
G 05
Org Unit
Environment Institute

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