Tira Rattanakosit

Miss Tira Rattanakosit

Higher Degree by Research Candidate

PhD Candidate

Adelaide Medical School

Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences


A Medical scientist with a business mind
‍ by day: PhD Candidate in Centre of Heart Rhythm Disorder
‍♀️ by night: Director of The Sorcerer's Bar

Project: PhD CandidateAtrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common type of arrhythmia seen in clinical practice. This asymptomatic disease affects approximately 1%–2% of the population and is one of the most common underlying cause of stroke. The underlying pathological initiation of AF is still under research. The abnormal electrical signal generally comes from the Pulmonary Vein. However, other tissue areas such as the coronary sinus musculature and superior vena cava have been recently identified as one of the initiation sites. The pathophysiology of AF demonstrates a complex relationship between the triggers, substrate and autonomic influences, thus the adverse cardiac physiological alterations may limit the possibility to restore and maintain the normal sinus rhythm.

Although options like antiarrhythmic drugs are widely used to combat the disorganized beats, due to poor efficacy of pharmacological therapy, patients are often recommended to undergo catheter ablations. An energy source such as Cryoablation (cold energy) and Radiofrequency ablation (hot energy) are used to ablate the dysfunction tissue. With recent studies showing Radiofrequency ablation (RF) to have high successful rates and less fluoroscopy exposure time, compared to Cryoablation, RF ablation catheter is now predominately used. The ablation for atrial fibrillation requires extensive ablation that involves the risk of collateral damage to the oesophagus, pulmonary veins, lungs, and the circumflex coronary artery. At the same time, there is recurrence due to gaps in linear ablation lines due to the recovery or repair of the tissue by the body.

This indicates that the key factors such as force, time and power, plays a predominant role in forming durable transmural lesions. Recently, novel indices have combined these key factors in a weighted formula known as Ablation Index and Lesion-Size Index to assist in lesion delivery. Further studies on these areas will provide better knowledge of lesion creation and its durability.

A Medical scientist with a business mind ??
??‍??by day: PhD Candidate in Centre of Heart Rhythm Disorder
??‍♀️?by night: Director of The Sorcerer's Bar

Project: PhD CandidateAtrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common type of arrhythmia seen in clinical practice. This asymptomatic disease affects approximately 1%–2% of the population and is one of the most common underlying cause of stroke. The underlying pathological initiation of AF is still under research. The abnormal electrical signal generally comes from the Pulmonary Vein. However, other tissue areas such as the coronary sinus musculature and superior vena cava have been recently identified as one of the initiation sites. The pathophysiology of AF demonstrates a complex relationship between the triggers, substrate and autonomic influences, thus the adverse cardiac physiological alterations may limit the possibility to restore and maintain the normal sinus rhythm.

Although options like antiarrhythmic drugs are widely used to combat the disorganized beats, due to poor efficacy of pharmacological therapy, patients are often recommended to undergo catheter ablations. An energy source such as Cryoablation (cold energy) and Radiofrequency ablation (hot energy) are used to ablate the dysfunction tissue. With recent studies showing Radiofrequency ablation (RF) to have high successful rates and less fluoroscopy exposure time, compared to Cryoablation, RF ablation catheter is now predominately used. The ablation for atrial fibrillation requires extensive ablation that involves the risk of collateral damage to the oesophagus, pulmonary veins, lungs, and the circumflex coronary artery. At the same time, there is recurrence due to gaps in linear ablation lines due to the recovery or repair of the tissue by the body.

This indicates that the key factors such as force, time and power, plays a predominant role in forming durable transmural lesions. Recently, novel indices have combined these key factors in a weighted formula known as Ablation Index and Lesion-Size Index to assist in lesion delivery. Further studies on these areas will provide better knowledge of lesion creation and its durability.

 

 

 

 

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  • Conference Papers

    Year Citation
    2019 Franke, K., Marshall, H., Kennewell, P., Pham, H., Rattanakosit, T., Aboustate, N., . . . Mahajan, R. (2019). Incidence of appropriate implantable cardioverter defibrillator therapy and sudden cardiac death in cardiac sarcoidosis - a systematic review and meta-analysis. In EUROPEAN HEART JOURNAL Vol. 40 (pp. 584). Paris, FRANCE: OXFORD UNIV PRESS.
  • Conference Items

    Year Citation
    2019 Agbaedeng, T., Emami, M., Munawar, D., Rattanakosit, T., Khadim, K., Elliott, A., . . . Sanders, P. (2019). Fibrosis detected by late-gadolinium enhancement cardiac MRI is associated with atrial fibrillation and poorer ablation outcome: A meta-analysis. Poster session presented at the meeting of EUROPEAN HEART JOURNAL. Paris, FRANCE: OXFORD UNIV PRESS.

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