Tamara Robins

Tamara Robins
Higher Degree by Research Candidate
School of Psychology
Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences

TAMARA G. ROBINS
BA, BHlthSc(Hons), MPsych(Clin), PhD (submitted)

Tamara is a Clinical Psychologist who provides assessment and treatment for a wide range of difficulties including mood, anxiety, trauma-related disorders, and stress management. She uses evidence-based treatments such as Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, and Dialectical Behaviour Therapy. Tamara provides an empathic approach and believes in working collaboratively with clients to understand their individual goals and to work towards meeting these. She works with clients to both decrease suffering and to build resilience, contentment and enjoyment.

Tamara has worked as a Clinical Psychologist in an adult community mental health team in Adelaide for many years. She has experience working with diverse mental health diagnoses including depressive and anxiety disorders, Bipolar Disorder, Schizophrenia/Psychosis and personality disorders, self-harm, emotion regulation difficulties. Additionally, Tamara’s research focus is on student and worker burnout and she has an associated interest in stress management and building resilience. Tamara is passionate about providing evidence-based treatment and is experienced in providing a range of evidence-based therapies including cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT), Dialectical Behaviour Therapy (DBT), Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), and Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT). Tamara has given lectures about CBT, psychosis and DBT at Flinders University.

Tamara has a Master of Clinical Psychology, Bachelor of Health Science, Honours (First class), and Bachelor of Arts (Psychology and Anthropology), all from The University of Adelaide. She is also currently completing a PhD focused on student and worker burnout, remotely through the University of Adelaide. Tamara has participated in many further CBT, ACT and mindfulness training courses, as well as participating in an extensive training course in DBT through Behavioral Tech. She holds full registration with the Psychology Board of Australia (Reg. #: PSY0001312620) with endorsement as a Clinical Psychologist. Tamara is a member of the Australian Psychological Society (APS) and the APS College of Clinical Psychologists.

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Tamara Robins

TAMARA G. ROBINS
BA, BHlthSc(Hons), MPsych(Clin), PhD (submitted)

Tamara is a Clinical Psychologist who provides assessment and treatment for a wide range of difficulties including mood, anxiety, trauma-related disorders, and stress management. She uses evidence-based treatments such as Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, and Dialectical Behaviour Therapy. Tamara provides an empathic approach and believes in working collaboratively with clients to understand their individual goals and to work towards meeting these. She works with clients to both decrease suffering and to build resilience, contentment and enjoyment.

Tamara has worked as a Clinical Psychologist in an adult community mental health team in Adelaide for many years. She has experience working with diverse mental health diagnoses including depressive and anxiety disorders, Bipolar Disorder, Schizophrenia/Psychosis and personality disorders, self-harm, emotion regulation difficulties. Additionally, Tamara’s research focus is on student and worker burnout and she has an associated interest in stress management and building resilience. Tamara is passionate about providing evidence-based treatment and is experienced in providing a range of evidence-based therapies including cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT), Dialectical Behaviour Therapy (DBT), Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), and Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT). Tamara has given lectures about CBT, psychosis and DBT at Flinders University.

Tamara has a Master of Clinical Psychology, Bachelor of Health Science, Honours (First class), and Bachelor of Arts (Psychology and Anthropology), all from The University of Adelaide. She is also currently completing a PhD focused on student and worker burnout, remotely through the University of Adelaide. Tamara has participated in many further CBT, ACT and mindfulness training courses, as well as participating in an extensive training course in DBT through Behavioral Tech. She holds full registration with the Psychology Board of Australia (Reg. #: PSY0001312620) with endorsement as a Clinical Psychologist. Tamara is a member of the Australian Psychological Society (APS) and the APS College of Clinical Psychologists.

Appointments

Date Position Institution name
2017 Clinical Psychologist Elizabeth Woodcock Psychology and Associates

Education

Date Institution name Country Title
2007 - 2008 The University of Adelaide Australia Master of Psychology (Clinical)
2005 - 2005 The University of Adelaide Australia Bachelor Health Science (Honours)
2002 - 2004 The University of Adelaide Australia Bachelor Arts (Psychology and Anthropology)

Postgraduate Training

Date Title Institution Country
Dialectical Behavior Therapy Behavioral Tech. Australia

Journals

Year Citation
2018 Robins, T., Roberts, R. & Sarris, A. (2018). The role of student burnout in predicting future burnout: exploring the transition from university to the workplace. Higher Education Research and Development, 37, 1, 115-130.
10.1080/07294360.2017.1344827
2017 Robins, T., Roberts, R. & Sarris, A. (2017). Understanding How Personality Impacts Exhaustion and Engagement: The Role of Job Demands, and Job and Personal Resources as Mediators. Australian Psychologist, Online, 1-10.
10.1111/ap.12310
2015 Robins, T., Roberts, R. & Sarris, A. (2015). Burnout and engagement in health profession students: the relationship between study demands, study resources and personal resources. Australasian Journal of Organisational Psychology, 8, 1-13.
10.1017/orp.2014.7
2014 Roberts, R., Robins, T., Gannoni, A. & Tapp, H. (2014). Survivors of childhood cancer in South Australia attending a late-effects clinic: a descriptive report of psychological, cognitive, and academic late-effects. Journal of Psychosocial Oncology, 32, 2, 152-166.
10.1080/07347332.2013.873998

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