Ryan Campbell

Ryan Campbell

Higher Degree by Research Candidate

School of Biomedicine

Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences


Ryan completed a Bachelor of Health Sciences degree at the University of Adelaide majoring in Neuroscience and Anatomical Science. Following this he completed a Bachelor of health and Medical Sciences (Honours) degree in Anatomical Science and received first class honours.

Ryan is currently undertaking his PhD in Medicine in the discipline of Anatomy and Pathology with the Biological Anthropology and Comparative Anatomy Research Unit at the University of Adelaide.

Ryan is also a skilled moulding and casting technician whose privately owned, well-equipped laboratory produces a number of casts of various objects. This includes a series of modern human skulls and medical simulation training materials supplied for teaching purposes to universities nationwide. Ryan also produces ocular prostheses and has professional experience moulding and casting for film.

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  • Journals

    Year Citation
    2021 Campbell, R. M., Vinas, G., Henneberg, M., & Diogo, R. (2021). Visual Depictions of Our Evolutionary Past: A Broad Case Study Concerning the Need for Quantitative Methods of Soft Tissue Reconstruction and Art-Science Collaborations. Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution, 9, 17 pages.
    DOI Scopus1
    2021 Campbell, R. M., Vinas, G., & Henneberg, M. (2021). Towards the restoration of ancient hominid craniofacial anatomy: Chimpanzee morphology reveals covariation between craniometrics and facial soft tissue thickness. PLoS ONE, 16(6 June), 25 pages.
    DOI
    2021 Campbell, R. M., Vinas, G., Henneberg, M., & Diogo, R. (2021). Visual Depictions of Our Evolutionary Past: A Broad Case Study Concerning the Need for Quantitative Methods of Soft Tissue Reconstruction and Art-Science Collaborations (vol 9, 639048, 2021). FRONTIERS IN ECOLOGY AND EVOLUTION, 9, 4 pages.
    DOI
    Campbell, R. M., Vinas, G., & Henneberg, M. (n.d.). Towards the restoration of ancient hominid craniofacial anatomy: Chimpanzee morphology reveals covariation between craniometrics and facial soft tissue thickness.
    DOI

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