Hannah Bannister

Hannah Bannister
Higher Degree by Research Candidate
School of Biological Sciences
Faculty of Sciences

I am a PhD Candidate in Associate Professor David Paton's ecology lab group. My research aims to identify factors influencing the reintroduction success and population persistence of brushtail possums in the semi-arid zone. My co-supervisors are Dr Katherine Moseby (UoA) and Robert Brandle (DEWNR).

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Hannah Bannister

I am a PhD Candidate in Associate Professor David Paton's ecology lab group. My research aims to identify factors influencing the reintroduction success and population persistence of brushtail possums in the semi-arid zone. My co-supervisors are Dr Katherine Moseby (UoA) and Robert Brandle (DEWNR).

My PhD research involves studying brushtail possums in the semi-arid zone. While brushtail possums were historically spread across much of Australia, in the past 200 years they have disappeared from more than half of their former distribution, with declines most pronounced in the arid and semi-arid zones. A partnership between DEWNR and FAME (The Foundation for Australia's Most Endangered Species) saw the brushtail possum reintroduced to the Ikara-Flinders Ranges National Park in 2015, where they have been locally extinct for around 70 years. Successful fox control via the Bounceback Program facilitated the reintroduction. My project aims to identify alternative release methods that may improve reintroduction success, as well determining whether previous exposure to predators is important for reintroduction success in an area where foxes are controlled. I'm also studying the diet and habitat use of the possums, something which has been little studied in the semi-arid zone. In order to monitor population persistence, I am intensively monitoring the survival and dispersal of juvenile possums, as well as reproduction by adult females. The lessons learnt from this research can be used by management agencies to address current brushtail possum declines in semi-arid regions, and may have applications for reintroductions of other closely related species.

Awards and Achievements

Date Type Title Institution Name Amount
2015 EMR Student Prize for a poster presentation on management or restoration The Ecological Society of Australia

Education

Date Institution name Country Title
2014 The University of Western Australia Australia Bachelor of Science (Honours)
2012 The University of Western Australia Australia Bachelor of Science (Zoology; Conservation Biology)

Research Interests

Conservation and Biodiversity, Ecology, Terrestrial Ecology

Journals

Year Citation
2016 Bannister, H., Lynch, C. & Moseby, K. (2016). Predator swamping and supplementary feeding do not improve reintroduction success for a threatened Australian mammal, Bettongia lesueur. Australian Mammalogy, 38, 2, 177-187. 10.1071/AM15020

Conference Items

Year Citation
2016 Bannister, H. L., Brandle, R., Paton, D. C. & Moseby, K. E. (2016). Does release method matter when reintroducing brushtail possums to the semi-arid zone?. SA NRM Conference. Adelaide.
2016 Moseby, K., Mooney, T., Jensen, M., Bannister, H. & Brandle, R. (2016). Trial reintroduction of the western quoll and brushtail possum to the Ikara-Flinders Ranges National Park. South Australian NRM Science Conference. Adelaide.
2015 Bannister, H. L., Brandle, R., Paton, D. C. & Moseby, K. E. (2015). Does release method matter when reintroducing brushtail possums to the semi-arid zone?. Ecological Society of Australia. Adelaide.
2014 Bannister, H. L., Lynch, C. E. & Moseby, K. E. (2014). Factors influencing the reintroduction success of the burrowing bettong (Bettongia lesueur) to arid Australia. Ecological Society of Australia. Alice Springs.

2016

  • $3,000 - Field Naturalists Society of South Australia
  • $3,000 - Nature Foundation South Australia
  • $1,000 - Nature Conservation Society of South Australia
  • $7,500 - Holsworth Wildlife Research Endowment
  • $1,500 - Australian Wildlife Society

    2015

    • $2,000 - Nature Foundation South Australia
    • $1,000 - Biology Society of South Australia
    • $7,000 - Holsworth Wildlife Research Endowment

    2014 (Honours):

    • $1,000 - Nature Foundation South Australia

      Memberships

      Date Role Membership Country
      2015 - ongoing Member Australian Wildlife Society
      2015 - ongoing Member Biology Society of South Australia
      2014 - ongoing Member Ecological Society of Australia
      2014 - ongoing Member Australian Mammal Society

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