Ms Tanya Court

Tanya Court
Senior Lecturer
School of Architecture and Built Environment
Faculty of the Professions

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Ms Tanya Court

Appointments

Date Position Institution name
2012 - 2012 Acting Head of School University of Adealide
2011 - 2012 Program Director Bachelor of Design Studies University of Adelaide
2008 Landscape Architecture Program Director University of Adelaide
2006 - 2007 Lecturer University of Adelaide
2002 - 2005 Lecturer The University of Melbourne
2001 - 2002 Associate Landscape Architect EDAW
1998 - 2001 Senior Associate Landscape Architect Paterson Pettus
1986 Director Tanya Court Projects

Awards and Achievements

Date Type Title Institution Name Country Amount
2011 Teaching Award Executive Dean of the Professions Prize for Excellence in Postgraduate Teaching University of Adealide Australia
2009 Award AILA Vic Award for Design Special Commendation for Art in the Landscape Australian Institute of Landscape Architecture Australia
2009 Award AILA SA Award for Planning Australian Institute of Landscape Architecture
2009 Award PIA SA Award for Planning Excellence: Urban Design – Plans and Ideas Planning Institute of Australia Australia
2009 Award PIA SA Award for Planning Excellence: Minister’s Award Planning Institute of Australia Australia
2007 Award Australia Award for Urban Design Planning Institute of Australia

Education

Date Institution name Country Title
1994 - 1998 RMIT Australia Bachelor of Applied Science (Landscape Architecture)
1983 - 1986 Curtin University Australia Bachelor of Arts Crafts
RMIT Australia PhD (Current candidate)

Research Interests

Journals

Book Chapters

Year Citation
2017 Court, T. (2017). Spring Enchantment: The Orchard. In Z. Zeunert, & T. Waterman (Eds.), Routledge Handbook to Landscape and Food. London.
2013 Court, T. (2013). Loosely civic: Collingwood Children's Farm. In G. Lee, & S. Ware (Eds.), Making Sense of Landscape (pp. 130-137). Washington DC: Spacemaker Press.
2012 Bette, U. I. (2012). Artist in Residence Studio. In T. Court, F. Bonnato, & J. Cys (Eds.), Design South Australia (pp. 145-147). Adelaide: Integrated Design Commission.
2012 Court, T. (2012). Environmental leadership. In Design South Australia (1 ed., pp. 108-139). Australia: Wakefield Press.
2012 Court, T. (2012). Helmet considered. In M. Jonas, & R. Monacella (Eds.), Exposure/00: Design Research Practice in Landscape Architecture (pp. 239-248). Melbourne: Melbourne Books.

Report for External Bodies

Year Citation
2014 Court, T., Ware, S. A., Anderson, C., Lee, V., Sack, C., Bowring, J., & Bartkowicz, K. (2014). Shared Mastery: An International Collaborative Approach to Masters in Landscape Architecture.

Original Creative Works

Year Citation
2016 Publication status: In preparation
NTRO sub category: 3 Written work
Title: Monash Geology Garden
Authors: Court T
Place of publication: Melbourne
Publication date: 2016
Extent: Discussion of didactic gardens using the Monash Geology Garden as a case study
Record created at source: 3 February 2016
2013 Publication status: Published
NTRO sub category: 2 Design/Architectural work
Title: Royal Adelaide Hospital Site Design Competition. ‘The RARA’ entry, by Court, Tanya; Phillips, Pilkington, Harrison, Lake
Authors: Court T, SLASH, Pilkington P
Place of publication: http://odasa.sa.gov.au/rahsite/
Publication date: 2013
Extent: 5.3 hectares
Description: The International Open Ideas Competition for the Royal Adelaide Hospital Site was initiated by the Government of South Australia, Office for Design and Architecture SA as part of a larger exploratory public engagement process to garner ideas and support for future development of the site. Entries were judged anonymously. The engagement and competition process set a number of research questions with regard to both the way the public might contribute to or influence site development as well as specific problems regarding site constraints including heritage considerations, and the nature of potential uses, materiality, linkages and integration. As an open public ideas competition the process was committed to public engagement, both in the ways that design ideas could communicate effectively and with regard to consideration of public uses in the proposed outcome. As the team’s landscape architect Tanya Court played a key role in coordinating an approach to the overall site and context, as well as specific attitudes to the distinctive site planting. The propositions explored and tested in the entry were based on a metaphor of surgery for an ailing body, its various parts and systems diagnosed with specific afflictions. “The jury was impressed by the depth of research into the social and physical history and condition of the RAH site. This research was evidenced and brought to life at all scales by the design proposal; from the architecture to heritage, engineering and landscape...” http://architectureau.com/articles/rah-winners-announced/
Language: en
Verification-status: Verified
ERA Research Statement - 2000 character limit: Research Background: The international Open Ideas Competition for the Royal Adelaide Hospital Site was initiated by the Government of South Australia, Office for Design and Architecture SA as part of a larger exploratory public engagement process to garner ideas and support for future development of the site. Entries were judged anonymously. Research Contribution: The engagement and competition process set a number of research questions with regard to both the way the public might contribute to or influence site development as well as specific problems regarding site constraints including heritage considerations, and the nature of potential uses, materiality, linkages and integration. As an open public ideas competition the process was committed to public engagement, both in the ways that design ideas could communicate effectively and with regard to consideration of public uses in the proposed outcome. As the team’s landscape architect, Tanya Court played a key role in coordinating an approach to the overall site and context, as well as specific attitudes to the distinctive site planting. The propositions explored and tested in the entry were based on a metaphor of surgery for an ailing body, its various parts and systems diagnosed with specific afflictions. Research Significance: “The jury was impressed by the depth of research into the social and physical history and condition of the RAH site. This research was evidenced and brought to life at all scales by the design proposal; from the architecture to heritage, engineering and landscape...
Record created at source: 20 November 2014
2013 Publication status: Published
NTRO sub category: 2 Design/Architectural work
Title: Mrs Robinson: Adelaide City Council Bike Rack
Authors: Court T
Place of publication: Adelaide
Publication date: 2013
Extent: 2 square miles
Notes: Court continues her interest in public realm interventions and experiments with the role of designers in shaping urban space and perception with an ‘art’ project that features as part of Adelaide City Council and Arts SA Bike Art Trail.

The project was an invited commission recognising the esteem with which Court’s work in this area is held by local authorities and agencies.

[attachments include design drawings and other material. Following links for our/internal ref.]
http://www.adelaidecitycouncil.com/assets/coa/bike-art-trail-2013.pdf
http://visual.artshub.com.au/news-article/bits-and-blogs/visual-arts/adelaide-art-bike-trail-197527
https://www.google.com/maps/ms?ie=UTF8&t=m&oe=UTF8&msa=0&msid=202501895377721887567.0004e6b6ce75f12684c0b
Verification-status: Verified
Record created at source: 20 November 2014

2013 Publication status: Published
NTRO sub category: 2 Design/Architectural work
Title: Packing
Authors: Court T, Miley J
Place of publication: Adealide
Publication date: 22 November 2013
Extent: The project was a temporary installation over the period 22 November - 24 November 2013.
Statement of responsibility: Tanya Court and Jess Miley
Rights statement: Tanya Court and Jess Miley
Description: Packing was collaboration between Jess Miley and Tanya Court. Felt Natural was a public art project presenting site-specific and time-based work along the River Torrens foreshore presented by FELTspace ari. Packing worked directly with the banks of the Torrens River, inscribing a line from one bank to another, creating an illusion of continuity across the river. The felt starts at the historic Police Box and “rolls” into the lake and emerges out the other side. Like a line on a map reconstructed in the landscape.
Source URL: http://www.feltspace.org/feltnatural
Medium: Public Art, Landscape installation
Notes: PACKING
Packing was collaboration between Jess Miley and Tanya Court. Felt Natural was a public art project presenting site-specific and time-based work along the River Torrens foreshore presented by FELTspace ari.

Invited artists were asked to select a site within the confines of the river bank between University footbridge and the Morphett Street Bridge

So the site was given and the response, as landscape architects and artists was to respond to the site itself. The Torrens Lake and banks are highly modified landscapes. A weir at one end converts the previous ephemeral river in to a lake with the banks also highly modified over the years. An early decision was discussed to work on both sides of the banks. On visiting the sites several locations were identified as having this potential. The site was eventually chosen for its high visibility and variety of landscape elements including undulations, retaining wall, trees and paths. It provided multiple viewpoints including picturesque views of the bridge in the background in contrast to the views along the path and also looking down and across the river.

Packing worked directly with the banks of the Torrens River, inscribing a line from one bank to another, creating an illusion of continuity across the river. The felt starts at the historic Police Box and “rolls” into the lake and emerges out the other side. Like a line on a map reconstructed in the landscape.

This geometric element draws attention to the existing landscape including typography and other more temporal characteristic including light and shadows.

While the interaction of the public was anticipated an unexpected aspect was the interaction of aboriginal people, particularly during installation but also for the duration of the installation. During the installation a group of people nearby asking questions about the work and more generally, telling us about their lives (I was rock star) etc. Later on during the installation three children returning from their adventures, immediately engaged with the work, rolling down the hill along the felt.

Interactions between strangers in public spaces are often limited but during the installation of Packing we had several people came up and asking what we were doing including the group of aboriginal people and the staff of the Popeye ferries (who claimed they would act as informal guides of the work) When they could people would walk around the felt but when this was no longer possible would ask permission to cross!

Packing used furniture removalists felt. 3 x 25 m (L) x 1.8m (W) rolls. The material includes recycled milk bottles. Packing was attached down to the earth with pins typically used for geotextile weed mats.

Packing references Michael Heizer’s earthwork Double Negative 1969-70 (Mormon Mesa, Overton, Nevada). We appreciate Heizer’s concerns including drawing attention to the context, ambiguity and the expressive potential of simple materials. While Double Negative created a void, Packing inscribes a line. But like Double Negative it is the relations with the site that are the real concern. Other so called land artists have also been interested in inscribing lines on the landscape including Robert Smithson, Richard Serra and Carl Andre.

Are there also references as diverse as Joseph Beuys use of felt and even ninja knitting’s textiles in public spaces? Is the work a send up of both Beuys’s earnestness and the knitting’s banality? Other associations may be the felt blankets given to aboriginal homeless and Adelaide gaol prisoners. It is also a send up of the ARI’s name, “FELTspace”. We aimed that the scale of the work suits the scale of the site.

Packing was a temporary installation as part of the Felt Natural exhibition official running to two days of the weekend in November. Packing was left installed till the following Wednesday when Adelaide City Council requested that it was removed. This was done and we were not surprised but delighted that Packing remained inscribed for a few more days as a yellowed strip of lawn. All evidence is now gone.
Verification-status: Verified
Record created at source: 3 February 2016

2012 NTRO sub category: 2 Design/Architectural work
Title: Biophilic Hindmarsh
Authors: Court T, MacDougall I, Meek S, Castricumn S, Pilkington M, masterton N
Place of publication: Adealide
Publication date: 2012
Extent: 2012
Notes: BIOPHILIC HINDMARSH : From Asphalt to Eden:
Changing an industrial precinct into a green suburb

Biophilic Hindmarsh is an exercise in the hypothetical greening of Adelaide’s inner-city suburb of Hindmarsh. How an inner suburb, with an industrial history and a current use pattern that underutilises its proximity to the city, can be revitalised. Its present problems include a monoculture of low intensity storehouse and service industry, a lack of residential accommodation and poor environmental and urban quality. Our hypothetical depicts an evolutionary transformation from its current character to a green place, rich experiences ensuring close proximity of residence, workplace and recreation for its locals, while also participating in the benefits of wider city. It is no enclave.

The term ‘biophilia’ literally means ‘love of life or living systems’ and was first used by Erich Fromm to describe the psychological orientation of being attracted to all that is alive and vital. The concept was popularized by Edward O. Wilson. Wilson suggests that biophilia describes “the connections that human beings subconsciously seek with the rest of life.” To affirm and cultivate a love of life that grasps and shares the fullest possibilities for urban living may be the greatest need of our age and is the greatest challenge for design. This project speculates on rediscovered and freshly reinvented possibilities for how we may live a life of rich engagement with a living urban landscape and its dynamic change.

Biophilic Hindmarsh was part of the Speculations project as part of Integrated Design Strategy for Adelaide. The team included representatives from ARM, Phillips Pilkington and The University of Adelaide.
Record created at source: 3 February 2016

2010 NTRO sub category: 2 Design/Architectural work
Title: Glance
Authors: Court T
Place of publication: Melbourne, Victoria
Publication date: 2010
Extent: The work was a temporary installation as part of the State of Design Conference
Description: Glance attempts to evocatively place back in to the landscape a quote from Janet Frame’s autobiographical An Angel at My Table. ‘We’d glance at each other, close as skin and distant as horizons’. The quote has been converted into QR Code. The codes graphic black and white conditions are converted to silver and void with laser cut ‘Bright Chrome’ mirrored vinyl stencils. In Glance the stencils have been placed in locations where their mirrored surfaces will reflect the view of the horizon behind the viewer.
Keywords: Public Art
Notes: Glance attempts to evocatively place back in to the landscape a quote from Janet Frame’s autobiographical An Angel at My Table. ‘We’d glance at each other, close as skin and distant as horizons’. The quote has been converted into QR Code. The codes graphic black and white conditions are converted to silver and void with laser cut ‘Bright Chrome’ mirrored vinyl stencils. In Glance the stencils have been placed in locations where their mirrored surfaces will reflect the view of the horizon behind the viewer.

To decode the graphic back into the text the viewer must stand as ‘close as skin’ and photograph their fractured portrait. The distorted face has some of the intrigue of the fun fair ‘Hall of Mirrors’. In particular weather changes affect the reflections and may change the ability of the code reader to decode the message. The QR codes rely on contrast that may not always be evident with the use of mirrors.

The use of mirrors is deliberate and extends a long fascination, historically, with the mirrors’ unique qualities but also it’s more recent use, particularly in minimalist and conceptual art from the 1960’s and early 1970’s. These qualities were surveyed in the Ann Stephens curated exhibition ‘Mirror Mirror: Then and Now.’ With mirrors there is instability to the representation though the movement of the viewer and the changing conditions of real. ‘Indexing the instability of perception, they invite viewers to participate in the purported endgame of late modernism.’
Record created at source: 3 February 2016

2009 Publication status: Published
NTRO sub category: 2 Design/Architectural work
Title: The Rundle Project (The Rundle Street Integrated Public Art Masterplan)
Authors: Court T, Horridge N
Publisher: Adelaide City Council
Place of publication: Adelaide, SA
Publication date: 2009
Pagination: 0 pages
Extent: 58 pages
Statement of responsibility: Tanya Court, WAX Design, SPUD and Naomi Horridge
Description: Type of work : Urban Masterplan Extent : 58 pages
Language: en
Notes: Migrated record 20140814

Research Statement
Research Background:
(field/context/research question/problem investigated)

The Rundle Project was commissioned by Adelaide City Council to provide direction for the facilitation and commissioning of public artworks within Rundle Street, Adelaide. Unlike many ultimately prescriptive Masterplans, The Rundle Project sought to develop a clear framework within which specific future works might be commissioned that would encourage high artistic merit and pieces of contemporary relevance. How can a report be a tool for generating ideas, mapping opportunities, promoting innovation, questioning convention and encouraging exceptional outcomes for integrated public art? Can the intersections of public art and urban design make proposals for new possibilities for adventurous public art commissioning that embraces uncertainty and temporality, conditions of the city itself?

Research Contribution:
(innovation/new knowledge to the discipline/repertoire)

This Masterplan identified potential sites for location of art works and developed an idea of six ‘typologies’ that described and located each type. This approach was intended to facilitate the highest level of engagement for artists and other collaborators in their response to Rundle Street. The report also
provides a number of resources, which can be used during the development of public art, as a ‘Toolbox’ of ideas and current thinking in relation to Rundle Street as a place, its history, contemporary art and the delivery of public art in the urban realm. Such a flexible but rigorously site-specific approach to ‘masterplanning’ posits a new approach to urban organisation.

Research Significance:
(evidence of excellence/peer recognition/public and peer published or otherwise documented interest and debate, other prestige factors)

Commended by the client and others involved (‘It is very smart - intelligent and strategically clever - in its approach.’ – David Kerr, Artist and Member of the Public Arts Round Table), the innovation of the project was subsequently recognised in key awards:
PIA SA Minister’s Award, Planning of Excellence Awards, 2009
AILA SA Landscape Architecture Award for Planning, 2009

[attachments include design drawings and other material. Following links for our/internal ref.]
http://www.adelaidecitycouncil.com/assets/acc/Community/arts-culture/docs/the_rundle_project.pdf

Award recognition / critique:
http://www.planning.org.au/documents/item/868 http://www.aila.org.au/sa/AWARDS/2009/
Verification-status: Verified
Record created at source: 14 August 2014

2008 Publication status: Published
NTRO sub category: 2 Design/Architectural work
Title: Helmet
Authors: Court T, Chilton C
Publisher: Manningham City Council
Place of publication: Banksia Park, Heidelberg, VIC
Publication date: 2008
Pagination: 0 pages
Extent: 15 x 5 metres
Description: Type of work : Landscape art - sculpture Extent : 15 x 5 metres
Language: en
Notes: Migrated record 20140814

Research Statement
Research Background:
(field/context/research question/problem investigated)

Helmet attempted to explore the nature of the interrelationships between the ‘sculpture’, the ‘site’ and audience. Revisiting and interpreting experiments of the 18thC Picturesque as well as later spatial experiments by artists and sculptors such as Richard Serra in relation to the lived and shifting experience of landscape, it explores how an object may help the observer re-see its context – the surrounding landscape – in ever-new ways.

Research Contribution:
(innovation/new knowledge to the discipline/repertoire)

While historic experiments by artists and some designers have investigated issues of evolving, context-specific environmental appreciation and analysis so pertinent to framing contemporary environmental concerns, there has been little recent discussion, fewer projects, and none known in Australia, a land of colonial occupation with particular observational prejudices and problems. The project began – and continues for those who experience it – in questioning the object’s reading as metaphor or symbol, its temporal qualities, and its reception as public sculpture, gateway, landscape architectural folly, billboard or sign. The dialogue involved in its creation (What do we wish to say? How do we make that understood?) is reflected in the dialogue intended in the experience of it (Where should this be read from? How should it be understood?). The purpose then of the enquiries and the subsequent expression in the work was a desire to inspire ongoing enquiry, to open the work to varied appreciations, making alternative and even contradictory appreciations possible. Helmet exposes our complicated relationship with landscape, considering cultural context, process, time, space and bodily experience as integral to understanding and valuing environment. This dialogue is ongoing, generating reflective thinking from new audience evaluations of the work as its context continues to change. An acknowledgement of the infinite and evolving condition of landscapes is built into the design.

Research Significance:
(evidence of excellence/peer recognition/public and peer published or otherwise documented interest and debate, other prestige factors)

The project was commissioned as a result of winning an open competition. It was subsequently awarded funding of $100,000 by the State Government of Victoria. It was awarded the AILA (Vic) Special Commendation for Art in the Landscape, 2009.

Publications examining the work:
Russell-Clarke, Jo (2009) “Helmet” Landscape Architecture Australia, May 2009 no. 122. P.42
Court, Tanya (2009) “Shift in Vision: Considering Helmet” in Shifting Perspective and Practice; An Interdisciplinary Future, AILA National Conference, invited paper, Melbourne Docklands 7-9 May.

[attachments include design drawings and other material. Following links for our/internal ref.]
http://www.manningham.vic.gov.au/live/home_arts/public_arts.html
http://www.dtf.vic.gov.au/domino/Web_Notes/MediaRelArc02.nsf/ebfd7a9e83f839b34a2568110023b2e3/48e38dad6a458ba5ca256c61007a6ed9!OpenDocument
Award recognition / critique:
http://www.aila.org.au/victoria/awards2009/helmet.htm
Verification-status: Verified
Record created at source: 14 August 2014

Position
Senior Lecturer
Phone
83135694
Fax
8313 4377
Campus
North Terrace
Building
Horace Lamb Building, floor 4
Room Number
4 68
Org Unit
School of Architecture & Built Environment

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