Dr Katharine Bartsch

Katharine Bartsch
Senior Lecturer
School of Architecture and Built Environment
Faculty of the Professions

My research examines how human mobility shapes the built environment, specifically Islamic architecture. Islam is a global faith and it has never existed in a vacuum. The emergence and diffusion of Islam can be traced along routes of migration, pilgrimage, trade, or travel in pursuit of knowledge. Given this context of mobility and the cultural encounters that it engenders, the goal of my research is to interpret the complexity and diversity of Muslim communities that is materialised in the built environment. Thus, my research is interdisciplinary, reaching beyond conventional discourses of architecture, to obtain rich insights from anthropology, cultural geography, world systems theories, postcolonial theory, and the history of travel. This approach enables a critical understanding of the production and transformation of the predominantly hybrid architecture of Muslim communities. Thus, my research aims to offer a compelling counter-narrative to pervasive misconceptions about architecture and Islam.

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Dr Katharine Bartsch

My research examines how human mobility shapes the built environment, specifically Islamic architecture. Islam is a global faith and it has never existed in a vacuum. The emergence and diffusion of Islam can be traced along routes of migration, pilgrimage, trade, or travel in pursuit of knowledge. Given this context of mobility and the cultural encounters that it engenders, the goal of my research is to interpret the complexity and diversity of Muslim communities that is materialised in the built environment. Thus, my research is interdisciplinary, reaching beyond conventional discourses of architecture, to obtain rich insights from anthropology, cultural geography, world systems theories, postcolonial theory, and the history of travel. This approach enables a critical understanding of the production and transformation of the predominantly hybrid architecture of Muslim communities. Thus, my research aims to offer a compelling counter-narrative to pervasive misconceptions about architecture and Islam.

Appointments

Date Position Institution name
2014 Senior Lecturer University of Adelaide
2005 - 2013 Lecturer University of Adelaide
1997 - 1997 Graduate Architect Philips and Pilkington Architects
1995 - 1998 Graduate Architect Cielens and Partners
1994 - 1995 Architect Intern Abhikram
1994 - 1994 Architect, Intern Lapsys and Keam Architects

Awards and Achievements

Date Type Title Institution Name Amount
2014 - 2016 Research Award ARC Linkage Grant Australian Research Council
2013 - 2013 Fellowship Faculty Women’s Fellowship University of Adelaide $15,000
2007 - 2007 Teaching Award Executive Dean of the Professions’ Prize for Excellence in UG Teaching University of Adelaide $2000
2006 - 2006 Award Innovation Funding Bid University of Adelaide
2005 - 2005 Research Award Small Faculty Research Grant University of Adelaide $6500
2003 - 2003 Research Award Brenda Nettle Grant: Australian Federation of University Women Australian Federation of University Women $1000
2003 - 2003 Research Award Samuel H. Kress Foundation Society of Architectural Historians $1000
2002 - 2002 Research Award Clive E. Boyce Fellowship University of Adelaide $2500
2001 - 2001 Research Award Adelaide University Research Abroad Scholarship University of Adelaide
1999 - 1999 Award The Kenneth and Hazel Milne Travelling Scholarship University of Adelaide $8000
1998 Research Award Australian Postgraduate Award University of Adelaide

Language Competencies

Language Competency
Italian Can read, understand spoken and peer review

Education

Date Institution name Country Title
University of Adelaide Australia Bachelor of Architectural Studies
University of Adelaide Australia Bachelor of Architecture (Hons I)
University of Adelaide Australia PhD

Research Interests

Architecture, Islamic Studies, Landscape Architecture, Urban Design

Journals

Year Citation
2017 Bartsch, K. (2017). Mutable Architecture. Transfers: International Journal of Mobility, 7, 2, 132-134.
10.3167/TRANS.2017.070211
2016 Scriver, P., Bartsch, K. & Rashid, M. (2016). The space of citizenship: drifting and dwelling in “imperial” Australia. Fabrications, 26, 2, 133-157.
10.1080/10331867.2016.1183762
2015 Bartsch, K. (2015). Building identity in the colonial city: the case of the Adelaide Mosque. Contemporary Islam, 9, 3, 247-270.
10.1007/s11562-015-0345-z
2014 Bartsch, K. A. & Rashid, M. (2014). Historical Fabulation: A Framework to Rethink The Islamic Architecture Outside Islamic World. International Journal of Architectural Research, 8, 1, 120-132.
2014 Rashid, M. M. & Bartsch, K. (2014). Architecture of the Adelaide Mosque: Hybridity, Resilience and Assimilation. Traditional Dwellings and Settlements Review, 25, 2, 65-75.
2014 Bartsch, K. & Kamleh, E. (2014). Karbala in Lucknow: an itinerary of architectural mobility. International Journal of Islamic Architecture, 3, 2, 267-302.
10.1386/ijia.3.2.267_1
2014 El Ashmouni, M. & Bartsch, K. (2014). Egypt's age of transition: unintentional cosmopolitanism during the reign of Muhammad ‘Alī (1805–1848). Arab Studies Quarterly, 36, 1, 43-74.
10.13169/arabstudquar.36.1.0043
2006 Bartsch, K. (2006). Cult of the Fountainhead and the Culture of our Architectural Community [2006 RAIA Architecture Awards; Critique].. Place, 2, 1, 12-14.
2006 Bartsch, K. (2006). Tectvs realises a Corbusian vision on the park. Place, 1, 6, 14-16.

Books

Year Citation
2007 S. Loo & K. Bartsch (Eds.) (2007). Proceedings of Panorama to paradise : scopic regimes in Architectural and urban history and theory : XXIV SAHANZ Adelaide 2007, 21-24 September, 2007. Society of Architectural Historians, Australia & New Zealand.

Book Chapters

Year Citation
2016 Kamleh, E. & Bartsch, K. (2016). Karbala in Lucknow: An Itinerary of Architectural Mobility. In C. Gruber (Ed.), Islamic Architecture on the Move (pp. 25-60). Chicago: Intellect, The University of Chicago Press.
2009 Bartsch, K. (2009). Roots or routes? Exploring a new paradigm for architectural historiography through the work of Geoffrey Bawa. In J. Traganou & M. Mitrasinovic (Eds.), Travel, Space, Architecture (pp. 167-188). Surrey, England: Ashgate Publishing Limited.

Conference Papers

Year Citation
2016 Malaque, I., Bartsch, K. & Scriver, P. (2016). Modelling the evolution of housing and socio-spatial processes in low income settlements: case of Davao City, Philippines. 50th International Conference of the Architectural Science Association. J. Zuo, L. Daniel & V. Soebarto (Eds.) Adelaide, South Australia.
2016 Bartsch, K., Scriver, P. & Rashid, M. (2016). Does not the glorious East seem to be transported to our shores? Perth’s Golden Mosque (1905). Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand (SAHANZ 2016: Gold)). A. Brennan & P. Goad (Eds.) Melbourne, Victoria.
2016 Dissanayake, N., Bartsch, K. & Scriver, P. (2016). Designing sustainable settlements in the context of megaprojects: lessons learnt from the Mahaweli Architectural Unit, Sri Lanka (1983-1989). 50th International Conference of the Architectural Science Association. J. Zuo, L. Daniel & V. Soebarto (Eds.) Adelaide, South Australia.
2015 Malaque, I., Bartsch, K. & Scriver, P. (2015). Learning from informal settlements: provision and incremental construction of housing for the urban poor in Davao City, Philippines. 49th International Conference of Architectural Science Association. R. Crawford & A. Stephan (Eds.) Melbourne, Australia.
2014 Malaque, I., Bartsch, K. & Scriver, P. (2014). Typology of urban households and their transition from informal to formal status. 40th IAHS World Congress on Housing: Sustainable Housing Construction. A. Tadeu, O. Ural, D. Ural & V. Abrantes (Eds.) Funchal, Madeira, Portugal.
2012 El-Ashmouni, M. & Bartsch, K. (2012). Influence and resistance: The rationale of al-'Imarah discourse (1939-1959). Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand (SAHANZ) Annual Conference. Launceston.
2012 Rashid, M. & Bartsch, K. (2012). Hybrid histories: A framework to rethink 'Islamic' architecture. Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand (SAHANZ) Annual Conference. Launceston.
2010 Bartsch, K. (2010). Re-orienting design pedagogy: Preparing tertiary students for professional architectural practice in an increasingly globalising world. Biennial Conference of the Asian Studies Association of Australia (ASAA). Adelaide.
2007 Morkoc, S. & Bartsch, K. (2007). Interpreting the architectural visibility of Islam: Mosques in South Australia. Panorama to Paradise. Rachel Hurst (Ed.) Adelaide, Australia.
2006 Bartsch, K. & Morkoc, S. (2006). Contested terrain or contact zone? The case of the Adelaide mosque, 1888-1889. SAHANZ. T. McMinn, D. J. Stephens & D. S. Basson (Eds.) Fremantle, Australia.
2005 Bartsch, K. & Malone, G. (2005). Why are we being taught by a naked artist? Exposing students to place through multi-disciplinary design education. International Conference of the Association of Architecture Schools of Australasia. K. Holt Damant & P. Sanders (Eds.) Brisbane, Australia.
2003 Bartsch, K. (2003). A prize for progress: transnational practice and the Aga Khan Award for Architecture. Annual Conference of the Society of Architectural Historians of Aust and New Zealand. Gevork Hartoonian (Ed.) Faculty of Architecture, University of Sydney.
2002 Bartsch, K. (2002). Tales of the City: Travelling South with a Muslim Pilgrim.

Australian Research Council Linkage Grant. The Architecture of Australia's Muslim Pioneers, 2014-2017.

Chief Investigators Dr Peter Scriver and Dr Katharine Bartsch with Research Associate Dr Mizanur Rashid, University of Adelaide

With Partner Investigator Dr Philip Jones, South Australian Museum, and Partner Investigator Dr Abdul Razak Sapian, International Islamic University of Malaysia.

Current Courses 2016

Design Studio I introduces concepts, principles and techniques which form the basis for future design studies and professional practice. Students explore design as a speculative process of inquiry and experimentation. This process begins in the design studio — a hands-on experience — where students produce drawings, models and other artefacts to explore and represent their ideas in weekly studio tasks. These formative, incremental studio tasks enable the development and resolution of the summative design assignments. In this way, the studios support the acquisition and preliminary development of skills to analyse, conceptualise, resolve and present well-reasoned design responses. Beginning with a specific site, Design Studio I focuses on the foundation element of the design disciplines (architecture, landscape architecture and urban design), the ground plane.  As such, this studio encourages students to engage in iterative design processes which integrate considerations of site, precedent, human scale, site engineering and material and physical data. Idea generation is central. Historical and contemporary design precedents are introduced (considered in parallel with History Theory I), and hand drawing and physical modelling (skills developed in parallel with Representation I) form the primary medium for design communication and exploration. The principles of digital representation are introduced as a tool to assist design, design ‘thinking’ and design communication. In addition, skills in oral communication are developed. It is imperative that designers can convey their ideas in a clear and convincing way. As an ongoing practice students are encouraged to develop an appreciation and ability for a high quality of craft and attention to detail, from micro through to macro scale; skills which are fundamental to successful design outcomes.

Environment I The course explores the notion that designers respond to pressing environmental, cultural, social and economic issues in the design and creation of our built environments. The course introduces the historical, political and ethical contexts and processes of environmental design. The relationship between climates, environments and design as both built structures and landscapes is explored at a variety of scales. This course introduces students to the complex context for the development of projects destined to shape our inevitably changing built environments. This course is the foundation for future courses focusing on design and the environment at Level II and Level III in the Bachelor of Design Studies.

History Theory II Building on History Theory I, this course expands and deepens the frameworks of historical and theoretical understanding that necessarily underpin current knowledge and practice in the disciplines of architecture, landscape architecture and urban design. The course focuses on the long history of Modernity (16th - 20th c.) as a process of globalisation, and its conceptual, formal, spatial and technological consequences for the development of the environmental design disciplines. Throughout the course disciplinary concerns will be considered within their social, cultural, political and environmental contexts. Students enhance their research and academic writing skills and consider other modes of interpreting and understanding historical and theoretical concerns.

CURRENT RESEARCH STUDENTS

Janelle Arbon, PhD Candidate. The Invisible Privatisation of Civic Space; Implications for the Landscape Architect (Principal 40%)

Nirodha Dissanayake, M.Phil. Candidate. Mahaweli Architectural Unit, Sri Lanka (1983-1989)

Isidoro Malaque III, PhD Candidate. Towards a Multi-Step Approach in the Resettlement of Urban Poor: The Case of Davao City, Philippines (Principal 50%)

Mansoor Ma, PhD Candidate. Beyond Aesthetics & Vistas: Decoding the Mirador de Lindaraja in the Alhambra, Spain, from the Perspective of Islamic Spirituality (Principal 50%)

Nadiyanti Mat Nayan, PhD Candidate. Protecting Heritage Curtilage in Kuala Lumpur (Principal 40%)

Zahra Ranjbari, PhD Candidate. Gardens of Eden: A Study of Persian Gardens in the Safavid Period (co-supervisor 20%)

Pragathi Sridhar, PhD Candidate (co-supervisor 20%)

COMPLETIONS

Kinda Samara, M.Phil., awarded 2016. The Rise of Modern Urbanity (tamaddun) in the Arab World: Education, Journalism, and Enlightenment (co-supervisor 20%)

Marwa El-Ashmouni, PhD, awarded April 2013. The Rationale of Architecture Discourses in Post-Independence Egypt: A Contrapuntal Reading of Alam Al-Benaa (1980-2000) (Principal 60%)

Elise Kamleh, PhD, awarded 2012. Eurasian Architectural Exchange in the Eighteenth Century. A Study of Three Gateway Cities: Istanbul, Lucknow and Aleppo (49% co-supervisor) 

Georgina Hafteh, Master of Landscape Architecture, Completed 2012. The Unique Garden Culture of Damascus (1600-1800) (20% co-supervisor)

Dr Namrata Vishwasrao, Awarded 2011. Sustainable Water Management in Semi-Arid India: Learning from the Gond and Kohli Indigenous Communities (30% co-supervisor)

Memberships

Date Role Membership Country
2013 - ongoing Member Australian Institute of Architects Australia

Committee Memberships

Date Role Committee Institution Country
2015 - ongoing Member Uniting Communities Redevelopment Steering Committee Uniting Communities Australia
Position
Senior Lecturer
Phone
83132305
Fax
8313 4377
Campus
North Terrace
Building
Barr Smith South
Org Unit
School of Architecture & Built Environment

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